Activism Discussion: Israeli Atrocity News Roundup - Jul 28, 2006

Israeli Atrocity News Roundup - Jul 28, 2006
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David Morgan \MAMS\
2006-07-29 14:24:02 EST
Israeli Atrocity News Roundup - Jul 28, 2006

Via NY Transfer News Collective * All the News that Doesn't Fit

excerpted from Abunimah News - 28 July 2006

1) Israel murders woman aged 75, four others in occupied Gaza (R)
2) Israel army "ethicist": killing civilians, flattening towns "moral" (JP)
3) Evidence enemy is using chemical arms in occupied Gaza (AFP)
4) Lebanon village struggles as food, medicine grow scarce (AFP)
5) 87 percent of Lebanese support Hizbullah resistance (CSM)
6) Invader will not allow UN to probe killing of observers in Lebanon (Ha)
7) Spineless Kofi Annan backs down as usual (Wash Times)
8) Israel reactivates collaborator radio, steps up black propaganda (BBC)

Ali Abunimah

**********************************************************

(1) Soldiers shoot dead 5 in Gaza, Jerusalem

The Jordan Times - 28 July 2006
http://jordantimes.com/fri/news/news4.htm

GAZA (Reuters) -- Israeli soldiers killed four civilians in
Gaza on Thursday, Palestinian medical workers said, while
police at a checkpoint in south Jerusalem killed a
Palestinian who shot at them.

Israel's offensive into the Gaza Strip to recover a
captured soldier and end cross-border rocket attacks has
largely been overshadowed by fighting against Hizbollah
fighters in Lebanon, but shows no sign of slackening.

Those who died on Thursday included a 75-year-old woman,
whose house was hit by a missile or shell. Medical workers
said another two civilians, aged 16 and 23, were killed in
an air strike. A male civilian died from his wounds from a
tank shell.

The army said the air strikes targeted groups of fighters,
including some who fired an anti-tank missile at troops.

A spokeswoman said the military did not fire at civilians
intentionally and was constantly warning them to evacuate
areas where fighters were present.

Meanwhile in south Jerusalem, Israeli border police killed
a Palestinian gunman who shot at them at a checkpoint. Two
Israeli officers were taken to hospital.

At least 149 Palestinians, around half of them fighters,
have been killed in the monthlong assault on Gaza.

Wednesday's death toll of 24 was the highest since Israeli
troops returned to the territory in late June, less than a
year after they had withdrawn following a 38-year
occupation.

Tanks and troops pushed into northeastern Gaza, a
stronghold of fighters firing rockets into Israel, early
on Wednesday and have remained. At least 12 of the 24
killed on Wednesday were fighters.

Fighters have kept up attacks with homemade rockets
despite the Israeli offensive.

Israel has rejected demands for a prisoner exchange by the
fighters who captured Corporal Gilad Shalit in a border
raid on June 25. Some of the fighters came from the armed
wing of the governing Hamas Islamist group.

The Hamas armed wing dismissed comments from Palestinian
President Mahmoud Abbas, during a visit to Rome on
Thursday, suggesting a solution could be imminent to the
case of the captured soldier.

"Nothing has changed in the case of the Israeli soldier,"
said Abu Ubaida, spokesman for the Izz Deen Qassam
Brigades.

"The file remains in the hands of the resistance factions
and not in the hands of any politician even if that
politician is Abu Mazen," Abu Ubaida said, using Abbas's
nickname.

Abbas had spoken to reporters in Rome after talks with
Italian Prime Minister Romano Prodi.

"I told the prime minister that as far as the question of
the abducted Israeli soldier is concerned efforts are
undergoing continuously that lead us to believe that the
solution will be imminent," he said through an
interpreter.

"I hope the soldier is in good health and that he can soon
return to his family. I would like to remind you that
there are 10,000 Palestinians in Israeli jails and we hope
that they too can return to their families," he said.

Chief Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat said Abbas'
remarks had been misinterpreted.

"I do not think that the president meant to say that the
release was imminent," Erekat told CNN television.
"Efforts are being exerted but I wouldn't jump to any
premature conclusions at this stage."

The offensive has put pressure on the Hamas-led
government, which was already struggling under a crippling
US-led aid embargo, designed to force the group to
recognise Israel's right to exist, renounce violence and
accept past peace deals.

**********************************************************

(2) 'IDF may be morally justified in flattening terror strongholds'

By NATHANIEL ROSEN

The Jerusalem Post - 28 July 2006
http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid=1153292016092&pagename=JPost%2FJPArticle%2FShowFull

The man who wrote the IDF code of ethics, Professor Asa
Kasher, has indicated that in the current circumstances in
southern Lebanon, provided the appropriate precautions are
taken, it may be "morally justified" to obliterate areas
with high concentrations of terrorists, even if civilian
casualties result.

"I don't know what the truth is about the circumstances,"
Kasher stressed. "But assuming that we warned the
civilians and gave them enough time to leave, and that the
civilians who remained chose, themselves, not to leave,
then there is no reason to jeopardize the lives of the
troops," he told The Jerusalem Post on Thursday.

Kasher's statements followed the deaths of nine soldiers
on Wednesday, eight of whom were ambushed at Bint Jbail.
Israel has been reluctant to use sufficient weaponry to
flatten the Hizbullah "terrorist capital" of Bint Jbail, a
policy that many have criticized as being overly sensitive
toward the enemy and its civilians.

Moshe Keynan, the father of a soldier killed in another
conflict, said he was angry with the IDF for jeopardizing
soldiers' safety to protect civilians.

"We need to worry that our kids return to their parents
and we need to worry about our family and sons and wives,
not how we look on BBC," said Keynan.

Meir Indor, director-general of the Terror Victims
Association, seconded Keynan's concerns.

"There is an argument which is dealing with the subject of
how much danger soldiers can be exposed to in order to
save civilians. I think the world already decided that you
don't sacrifice your soldiers in order to save enemy
civilians," said Indor, whose organization is lobbying the
military and the government against putting soldiers in
unnecessarily dangerous situations.

The IDF denied the claim that its measures to prevent
civilian casualties puts its soldiers at unnecessary risk.

"We are taking precautions to protect civilians but we
will not do so at the expense of our own soldiers' and
civilians' lives," said a military source.

Joining the debate, Internal Security Minister Avi Dichter
was quoted by The New York Times on Thursday as saying
that Israel was unwilling to bomb villages without warning
and invade with massive amounts of ground troops because
"you'll kill a lot more innocent people and suffer a lot
more casualties."

Kasher admitted that the decision to bomb a house or town
was quite complicated, especially if there are citizens
who wanted to leave but were prohibited from doing so by
Hizbullah.

"We should take into consideration that people want to
leave and aren't allowed to leave, and that changes the
situation, but not on a grand scale," he said. "There you
can justify certain infantry attacks... but only if it
doesn't dramatically increase the jeopardy of our troops.
Something which is a slightly higher level of risk is
acceptable, but something drastically higher is not
acceptable."

Kasher told the Post that the IDF acts according to two
sets of moral considerations. The first is the IDF's code
of ethics, The Spirit of the IDF, which was written by
Kasher and a committee of generals in the early 1990's.
The guidelines enumerate such values as sanctity of human
life, human dignity, and purity of arms. Additionally, the
IDF takes international law into consideration, although
Kasher noted that international law is directed more
toward two countries fighting each other rather than a
country fighting a guerrilla or terrorist group.

"There is an ingredient of international law that is well
developed concerning classical wars to draw a distinction
between combatants and civilians... However, in cases of
acting against terror or guerrillas it is simply
inapplicable, because the people on the other side are not
combatants of a military organization. The whole idea of
drawing a distinction evaporates," said Kasher.

**********************************************************

(3) Mysterious wounds from Israeli shells in Gaza

By Jennie Matthew

Agence France-Presse - 28 July 2006
http://jordantimes.com/fri/news/news9.htm

GAZA CITY -- "When the bomb exploded from the plane. I felt
I was in hell. Real hell," shouts 31-year-old Ghassan
stabbing the air with his finger and straining over the
side of his grubby hospital bed.

Professing allegiance to Palestinian national security but
parroting ideology atune to armed factions, Ghassan went
to Gaza's Maghazi refugee camp last week to fight the
Israelis during a particularly bloody incursion.

"I feel chemicals. I feel high heat, I feel high pain," he
elaborates in English, both legs heavily bandaged, as
patients and visitors brush past in a crowded corridor of
Gaza's Shifa Hospital. "They found shrapnel with 'test'
written on it," he shouts.

Accusations abound that the Israelis, pressing a nearly
five-week offensive in which 130 Palestinians have been
killed in Gaza, are using a new weapon.

Doctors say they have never before seen such specific burn
injuries, concentrated so much on the lower body and
causing such a high propensity of amputations. The health
ministry has already called for an independent inquiry.

A French humanitarian group reported unusually severe
injuries.

One of its doctors reportedly raised the possibility that
Israel used cluster bombs.

In response to a query about use of a new type of weapon
possibly containing chemicals, the army said only that
"specific claims are being checked".

"The IDF [Israel Defence Force] use of weapon and
ammunition conforms with international law," it said in a
statement.

But the Palestinian health ministry spokesman told AFP
that "we are sure that the occupation forces are using
bombs that are forbidden under international law." At the
Aqsa Martyrs Hospital in Deir Balah, Habes Wehedi, a
softly spoken senior surgeon, said medical staff were
"amazed" by injuries of more than 30 per cent of the
wounded admitted from Maghazi.

"There were amputations of limbs. Most patients were
afflicted below the waist. They had burns all over their
lower limb," he said.

Others were afflicted by what he described as "translucent
shrapnel not shown by X-ray" that caused burns.

Wehedi studied in Romania and throughout his 20 years in
emergency medicine in Gaza and Jerusalem says this is the
first time he's seen such wounds.

A piece of plastic with the word "test" written on it had
been found. "I think it was in one of the patient's wounds
or something like that. One of the nurses came to me. I
saw it myself and touched it with my hand." Admitting
there are no analysis laboratories in the poorly equipped
hospital, he confesses he has no concrete proof only
"suspicion" that the Israelis shelled something other than
the usual tank and plane fodder.

"As far as we are concerned, this is a new weapon for us.
This could be phosphorus, chemicals or a mix, but until we
find out and conduct an analysis we can't say what type
exactly," he told AFP.

Visiting two patients bearing the hallmarks of such
injuries who have not yet been discharged or sent for
referral, Wehedi gently points out the injuries on 16 and
17-year-old boys.

Ismail el-Sawaferi's lower legs, torso and face are
splattered everywhere with flecks of burn. His thighs and
abdomen are heavily bandaged. The 17-year-old said he was
standing in a group attacked from the air.

"I saw a light shinning in my face. I couldn't hear
anything. I was deaf. I lost my clothes and after that I
woke up in the emergency room," he said.

Wehedi's suspicions are backed up by fellow Deir Balah
Hospital doctor Ismail Bashir, 40, who has been working in
emergency medicine since the first Palestinian uprising
broke out in 1987.

Stuart Shepherd from the UN Office for the Coordination of
Humanitarian Affairs said "some kind of inquiry" was
needed, confirming that the Palestinian health ministry
had already requested an independent commission of
inquiry.

French group Medecins du Monde said its emergency doctor,
Regis Garrigues, who has travelled regularly to Gaza
"noted the particular gravity and severity of injuries"
from the latest conflict.

Garrigues was quoted as telling French newspaper
Liberation that "this resembles the effects of cluster
bombs", particularly dangerous because they have a high
level of duds that can explode much later after the
attack.

The US-based rights group, Human Rights Watch, also
accused Israel of using artillery-fired cluster munitions
in Lebanon.

**********************************************************

(4) Lebanon village struggles as food, medicine grow scarce

By Beatrice Khadige

Agence France-Presse - 28 July 2006
http://jordantimes.com/fri/news/news6.htm

RMEISH -- Cut off from the rest of the country but still
relatively unscathed, the border village of Rmeish in
southern Lebanon is reeling under a wave of refugees as
food, fuel and medicine grow scarce.

A largely Christian community in a territory dominated by
Shiite Muslims, the village feels it is caught in the
middle of the war between the Shiite Hizbollah and Israel,
and its inhabitants curse both sides.

The most pressing concerns, though, is the lack of basics
and fears that diseases such as cholera may soon take
hold.

"There has been no water for two weeks, no more bread, no
more fuel, no more medicine," the mayor, Khalil Hage, told
AFP.

The few humanitarian aid convoys that are cautiously
venturing into the south have not arrived.

"Now we are forced to fill baby bottles with the
scum-filled water from the pond," Hage says, pointing to a
stagnant pool of water in the middle of the village,
surrounded by charmless grey concrete buildings.

With only four deaths from Israeli attacks, Rmeish is
considered a relative sanctuary for residents from
worse-hit areas nearby, many of which have suffered more
than twice the number of casualties. As a result, refugees
have streamed in, believing that Israel will spare the
place because of its Christian roots.

The population, previously around 8,000, has swelled to
more than 30,000 with the influx, and homeless families
fill the streets or squeeze into locals' homes.

"The children have lice because they can't wash themselves
and they're packed in like sardines -- 60 people living in
apartments with just three bedrooms," says one woman,
Samia.

She shows a reporter her father's house which is
accommodating around 100 refugees from Ait-Shaab, a
neighbouring village that has been gutted by Israeli
firepower. "Once again, Israel has destroyed Lebanon,"
says an old woman who does not give her name. She comes
from another nearby village, Ein Ebel.

"The Jews won't leave us alone. Isn't it enough what
they've done to the Palestinians?" she cries.

"The only thing we can do is flee to Israel," says another
woman, afraid that Rmeish will soon be caught up in the
bloody battle between Hizbollah and the Israeli army. Some
are scathing about the Lebanese group and its leader,
Hassan Nasrallah, "who never should have abducted those
two soldiers" taken on the Israeli side of the border on
July 12.

"Lebanon has been brought down by an idiot, a crazy man,"
says a young man. "I've been crying for days. This is all
so absurd," he says, identifying himself only by the
nickname Corteve.

"If he wants to give Lebanon back its dignity, Nasrallah
should commit suicide," butts in another young man who
declines to give any name.

**********************************************************

(5) Israeli strikes may boost Hizbullah base

Hizbullah support tops 80 percent among Lebanese factions.

By Nicholas Blanford

Christian Science Monitor - 28 July 2006
http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0728/p06s01-wome.html

TYRE, LEBANON - The ferocity of Israel's onslaught in
southern Lebanon and Hizbullah's stubborn battles against
Israeli ground forces may be working in the militant
group's favor. "They want to shatter the myth of Israeli
invincibility," says Amal Saad-Ghorayeb, a leading
Lebanese expert on Hizbullah. "Being victorious means not
allowing Israel to achieve their aims, and so far that is
the case."

Still, the intensity of the Israeli bombing campaign
appears to have taken Hizbullah aback. Mahmoud Komati, the
deputy head of Hizbullah's politburo told the Associated
Press, "the truth is - let me say this clearly - we didn't
even expect [this] response ... that [Israel] would
exploit this operation for this big war against us."

When Hizbullah guerrillas snatched two Israeli soldiers
from across the border, it appeared to be a serious
miscalculation. In the days that followed the July 12
capture, Israel unleashed its biggest offensive against
Lebanon since its 1982 invasion, smashing the country's
infrastructure, creating 500,000 refugees, and so far
killing more than 400 civilians.

Thursday, Israeli air and artillery strikes continued in
southern Lebanon and the International Committee of the
Red Cross said bodies were laying in the streets of some
Lebanese border villages where fighting has trapped
civilians. Also Thursday Al Qaeda's second in command,
Ayman Zawahiri, called in a televised video for Muslims to
join fighting in the Gaza Strip and Lebanon in a holy war
against Israel. While al-Qaeda is a Sunni Muslim group
which in general views Shiites, who make up Hizbullah's
ranks, with disgust and not even as Muslims, they share a
common hatred of Israel and the US.

In a televised address Tuesday, Hassan Nasrallah,
Hizbullah's secretary general, said the Israeli onslaught
was an attempt by the US and Israel to "impose a new
Middle East" in which Lebanon would be under US hegemony.

"Our fate is to confront this plan ... we are waging a war
for the liberation of the remaining occupied lands and the
liberation of our detainees," Mr. Nasrallah said.

Ms. Saad-Ghorayeb says that Hizbullah's goals have
changed, "assuming a wider strategic importance" in which
the party is at the forefront of opposition to the Bush
administration's agenda of transforming the Middle East
into a series of pro-Western democracies.

"Hizbullah is in a unique position to confront the US
agenda which if successful will be, by extension, a
victory for Syria, Iran and Hamas," she says.

Hizbullah's top guerrilla fighters are mounting a stubborn
campaign against the region's most powerful army in and
around Bint Jbail, the largest Shiite town in the border
district where support for the party runs high.

Hizbullah has had six years - ever since Israel withdrew
from south Lebanon - to prepare for this climactic
showdown. Instead of storing weapons and ammunition in
vulnerable stockpiles, they are scattered throughout the
south in natural caves, tunnels, and homes. Hizbullah
officials say they have sufficient ammunition and high
morale tofight for months.

Hizbullah's frontline fighters are battle-hardened
veterans after fighting Israeli forces in the 1990s. They
are armed with advanced Russian antitank missiles, which
have proved deadly against Israel's vaunted Merkava tanks
and use classic hit-and-run guerrilla tactics.

"Hizbullah is doing what it does best, harassing the
enemy," says Timur Goksel, who served 24 years with the UN
peacekeeping force in south Lebanon.

Indeed, Nasrallah has announced the launch of the "second
phase of our struggle" in which his long-range rockets
would "go beyond Haifa," Israel's third-largest city.
Israeli officials have been bracing for possible rocket
attacks on Tel Aviv, which would mark a major escalation
in the conflict.

"If Hizbullah hits Tel Aviv, I think that Israel will
totally wipe off the map Bint Jbail, Khiam, Tyre and
Nabatieh," says Nizar Abdel-Kader, a columnist for
Ad-Diyar newspaper and a retired Lebanese army general.

The stakes are high for Hizbullah, but it seems it can
count on an unprecedented swell of public support that
cuts across sectarian lines.According to a poll released
by the Beirut Center for Research and Information, 87
percent of Lebanese support Hizbullah's fight with Israel,
a rise of 29 percent on a similar poll conducted in
February. More striking, however, is the level of support
for Hizbullah's resistance from non-Shiite communities.
Eighty percent of Christians polled supported Hizbullah
along with 80 percent of Druze and 89 percent of Sunnis.

Lebanese no longer blame Hizbullah for sparking the war by
kidnapping the Israeli soldiers, but Israel and the US
instead.

The latest poll by the Beirut Center found that 8 percent
of Lebanese feel the US supports Lebanon, down from 38
percent in January.

"This support for Hizbullah is by default. It's due to US
and Israeli actions," says Saad-Ghorayeb, whose father,
Abdo, conducted the poll.

The most favorable outcome for Hizbullah, analysts say, is
to keep harassing Israel until there is a cease-fire
agreement that essentially leaves Hizbullah intact. If
Israel establishes an occupation zone along the border to
police the area, Hizbullah will likely continue fighting,
unhindered by a weakened Lebanese government and backed by
a radicalized Shiite community. That growing
radicalization is palpable in this laid-back coastal town
where support for Hizbullah traditionally has been
arbitrary.

Ghassan Farran, a doctor and head of a local cultural
organization, gazes in disbelief at the pile of smoking
ruins which was once his home. Minutes earlier, an Israeli
jet dropped two guided missiles into the six-story
apartment block in the centre of Tyre.

"Look what America gives us, bombs and missiles," says
this educated, middle-class professional. "I was never a
political person and never with Hizbullah but now after
this I am with Hizbullah."

**********************************************************

(6) Israel says UN can't be part of probe of deadly attack on post

Haaretz - 28 July 2006
http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/743541.html

Israel's ambassador to the United Nations ruled out
Thursday major UN involvement in any potential
international force in Lebanon, saying more professional
and better-trained troops were needed for such a volatile
situation.

Dan Gillerman also said Israel would not allow the United
Nations to join in an investigation of an Israeli air
strike that demolished a post belonging to the current UN
peacekeeping mission in Lebanon. Four UN observers were
killed in the Tuesday strike.

"Israel has never agreed to a joint investigation, and I
don't think that if anything happened in this country, or
in Britain or in Italy or in France, the government of
that country would agree to a joint investigation,"
Gillerman said.

He apologized for the strike that killed the four UN
observers, but said the conflict was a war and that
accidents happen.

"This is a war which is going on," he told reporters. "War
is an ugly thing and during war, mistakes and tragedies do
happen."

Gillerman, who spoke at an event hosted by The Israel
Project advocacy group and later inside the United
Nations, gave a heated defense of Israel's two-week
campaign against Hezbollah militants. He said some
diplomats from the Middle East had told him that Israel
was doing the right thing in going after Hezbollah.

His refusal to conduct a joint investigation will be a
slap to UN officials, who have specifically sought to
partner with Israel to investigate the bombing.

Gillerman was highly critical of the current UN
peacekeeping force, deployed in a buffer zone between
Israel and Lebanon since 1978, saying its facilities had
sometimes been used for cover by Hezbollah militants and
that it had not done its job.

"It has never been able to prevent any shelling of Israel,
any terrorist attack, any kidnappings," he said. "They
either didn't see or didn't know or didn't want to see,
but they have been hopeless."

Gillerman even mocked the name of the force - the UN
Interim Force in Lebanon.

"Interim in UN jargon is 28 years," he said.

The flaws with the UN force make it imperative that any UN
force come from somewhere else, though it could have a
mandate from the United Nations, he said.

"So obviously it cannot be a United Nations force,"
Gillerman said. "It will have to be an international
force, a professional one, with soldiers from countries
who have the training and capabilities to be effective."

Any such force must have two main objectives. It must
disarm completely and make sure Hezbollah has lost all its
capacity as a terror organization, he said, and it should
monitor the border between Syria and Lebanon "to make sure
that no additional shipments of arms, rockets, illegal
weapons, enter Lebanon."

Despite Israel's opposition to a UN force, Gillerman said
Israel was not "excluding anybody," and that "the makeup,
the composition and the countries which would supply the
soldiers to that force still has to be decided."

Gillerman said Israel would welcome any information from
the UN as it conducts its investigation, and will consider
any UN requests for information.

UN Council expresses 'shock' over IAF attack on UN post

The UN Security Council adopted a statement on Thursday
expressing shock and distress at Israel's bombing of a UN
outpost in Lebanon that killed four unarmed UN
peacekeepers.

China demanded Thursday morning that Israel apologize for
the death of a Chinese UN observer in southern Lebanon on
Tuesday. Three other observers - an Austrian, a Canadian,
and a Finn - died in the air strike.

The policy statement, which carries less weight than a
resolution, was weaker than one proposed by China and
other nations, after more than a day of negotiations and
objections from the United States, which wanted to make
sure Israel was not directly blamed for the attack.

China, expressing frustration at the delay, earlier warned
the United States that its opposition to the statement
could could jeopardize UN negotiations on a resolution
ordering Iran to stop its nuclear enrichment. One of the
peacekeepers killed on Tuesday was Chinese. The other
three came from Austria, Canada and Finland.

The final draft adopted by the 15-member council
eliminated wording "condemning any deliberate attack
against UN personnel" as well as a call for a joint
Israeli-UN investigation, which UN Secretary-General Kofi
Annan had asked for.

Instead, it called on Israel "to conduct a comprehensive
inquiry into this incident, taking into account any
relevant material from United Nations authorities."

It said the Security Council "is deeply shocked an
distressed by the firing by the Israel Defense Forces on a
United Nations Observer post in southern Lebanon on 25
July, 2006, which caused the death of four U.N. military
observers."

Israel has apologized and called the incident a mistake.

UN officials said they asked Israel a dozen times to stop
bombing near the post in the hours before it was
destroyed.

Jane Lute, an American and an assistant secretary-general
for peacekeeping, briefed the Security Council that the
outpost came under Israeli fire 21 times, including four
direct hits.

After the statement was adopted, China's UN Ambassador
Wang Guangya said he was relieved action was taken even if
the final draft was watered-down. He had previous said he
was frustrated by the U.S. position.

EU official: Israel misinterpreted our declaration at Rome
summit Israel has drawn the wrong conclusions from
statements made at the summit held in Rome this week on
the Middle East crisis, a European Union official said
Thursday.

Finnish Foreign Minister Erkki Tumioja, whose country
currently holds the EU presidency, said the Israeli
government's interpretation of the summit's declaration as
permission to continue its offensive is "their own and
wrong interpretation."

The summit's final statement called for a United Nations
force to be deployed in southern Lebanon to aid the
country in implementing UN decisions on disarming
Hezbollah. The statement also called for increased
humanitarian aid to Lebanon.

The United States, which fiercely opposed the calls for an
immediate cease-fire during the Rome conference Wednesday,
has been working on its own proposal for solving the
conflict in Lebanon.

Its initiative calls for Israel's withdrawal from the
Shaba Farms and a deployment of NATO forces to guarantee
Hezbollah's disarmament.

While the U.S. initiative calls for transferring control
of Shaba Farms to Lebanon, it stipulates that the
permanent international border will not be determined if
Syria continues to refuse to agree on the boundaries of
this area. The UN is to be in charge of handing Shaba
Farms over to Lebanon.

The American proposal also calls for a 20-kilometer-wide
strip of southern Lebanon, starting at the Israeli border,
which would be declared a no-go zone for Hezbollah.

An international force headed by NATO commanders, with
authority to use both deterrent and offensive force, would
be deployed in this strip to monitor and stabilize the
situation.

Ninety days after being deployed, this force would become
a part of the UN-sponsored force, with the option of
incorporating the UNIFIL troops currently serving in
southern Lebanon.

**********************************************************

(7) Annan accepts Israel's apology

By Betsy Pisik

THE WASHINGTON TIMES - 27 July 2006
http://www.washingtontimes.com/world/20060726-113212-1307r.htm

BEIRUT -- U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said yesterday
that he accepted Israel's apology for the bombing of a
United Nations' base in southern Lebanon, but he continued
to make clear in public remarks that he does not quite
believe that Tuesday's deadly attack was an accident. Mr.
Annan said he received a telephone call in which Israeli
Prime Minister Ehud Olmert "expressed his deep sorrow at
what happened."

"We accept that," the secretary-general told reporters
yesterday in Rome. He added that an investigation pledged
by Israel should be conducted jointly with the United
Nations. Israel Defense Forces shelled the U.N. Interim
Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) on Tuesday, killing four members
and destroying at least one office and residence at the
long-established base. Mr. Annan said late Tuesday that
the sustained attack was "apparently deliberate" but
yesterday softened his position after strong criticism
from Washington.

The Security Council convened an emergency meeting
yesterday to hear a preliminary U.N. report on the
shelling, which apparently lasted most of Tuesday.

For six frantic hours Tuesday night, U.N. officials in New
York and southern Lebanon repeatedly asked Israeli
political and military contacts to halt shelling in the
vicinity of the U.N. observer mission on the Lebanese
border, a peacekeeping official said.

Nonetheless, the operations base took 21 strikes from
Israeli artillery, Jane Holl Lute, assistant
secretary-general for peacekeeping operations, told
council members yesterday. The four members of the force
who were killed in the attacks were from China, Finland,
Canada and Austria. "Firing continued during the rescue
operation despite repeated requests to the [Israel Defense
Forces] for an abatement," she told the council.

"To our knowledge, unlike in the vicinity of some of our
other patrol bases, Hezbollah firing was not taking place
within the immediate vicinity of the patrol base," she
said.

Ms. Lute noted that despite these urgent calls, Israel
continued to fire on U.N. positions into yesterday
afternoon, local time. Mr. Annan showed his impatience
yesterday during an international conference aimed at
finding a political and military solution to the conflict.

"Our general and troops -- people on the ground -- were in
touch with the Israeli army, warning them, 'Please be
careful. We have positions here. Don't harm our people.'
And many calls went out until this happened," he said.

**********************************************************

(8) Israel steps up "psy-ops" in Lebanon

By Peter Feuilherade

BBC Monitoring - 28 July 2006
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/middle_east/5217484.stm

From mass targeting of mobile phones with voice and text
messages to old-fashioned radio broadcasts warning of
imminent attacks, Israel is deploying a range of old and
new technologies in Lebanon as part of the psychological
operations ("psyops") campaign supplementing its military
attacks.

According to US and UK media outlets, Israel has
reactivated a radio station to broadcast messages urging
residents of southern Lebanon to evacuate the region. Some
reports have named the station as the Voice of the South.

The South Lebanon Army, a Christian militia backed by
Israel, operated a radio station called Voice of the South
from Kfar Killa in southern Lebanon in the 1980s and
1990s.

The station closed down in May 2000 when Israeli forces
withdrew from southern Lebanon.

Cash for tip-offs

The Israeli newspaper Maariv on Sunday reported the
appearance of a website called All 4 Lebanon which offered
payment for tip-offs from Lebanese citizens "that could
help Israel in the fight against Hezbollah".

According to Maariv, the site, with content in Arabic,
English and French, had been set up by Israeli
intelligence.

"We appeal to everyone who has the ability and the desire
to uproot the sore called Hezbollah from your heart and
from the heart of Lebanon," the paper quoted the website
as saying in Arabic.

On its English-language page, the site says: "Whoever is
able and willing to help Lebanon eradicate Hezbollah's
evil and get back its independence, freedom and prosperity
is hereby invited to contact us."

It adds: "For your own safety, please contact us from
places where no-one knows you."

The Arabic wording is identical to that on leaflets which
Israeli aircraft have been dropping over Beirut and the
south of Lebanon.

The leaflets called on people to "remove the sore known as
Hezbollah from the heart of Lebanon".

The rewards "could be a range of things, such as cash or a
house", according to an Israel Defence Forces spokeswoman
quoted by Reuters news agency.

It was not clear how such items would be delivered or
exactly what information Israel wanted, Reuters noted.

Mobile aggression

On Friday, residents of southern Lebanon reported
receiving recorded messages on their mobile phones from an
unknown caller.

The speaker identified himself as an Israeli and warned
people in the area to leave their homes and head north.

Dubai-based news channel al-Arabiya TV reported that the
recorded messages also said they "held the Lebanese
government responsible for the abduction of the two
Israeli soldiers, and called on Lebanon to set them free".

Inquiries by Lebanon's communications ministry revealed
that the calls had come from exchanges in Italy and
Canada, but had originated in Israel.

According to US magazine Time, Israel has been targeting
SMS text messages at local officials in southern Lebanon,
urging them to move north of the Litani river before
Israeli military operations intensified.

The UK's Guardian newspaper said mobile phone users in
Lebanon were regularly receiving messages to their phones
which purported to be news updates, attempting to
discredit Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah or his party.

Satellite warfare next?

As Israel broadens its psyops activities, it also
continues to attack media targets using conventional
military means.

Air raids on Saturday hit transmission stations used by
Hezbollah's al-Manar TV, Future TV and the Lebanese
Broadcasting Corporation (LBC). A technician working for
LBC was reported to have been killed.

The next day, a convoy of journalists from Lebanese and
pan-Arab TV channels was attacked by Israeli planes while
on a tour of southern Lebanon; no injuries were reported.

According to an unconfirmed report by Egypt's Middle East
News Agency, Israel managed on Sunday "to intercept the
satellite transmissions of Hezbollah's al-Manar TV channel
for the third successive day, replacing it with Israeli
transmissions that reportedly showed Hezbollah command
sites and rocket launching pads which Israel claimed it
has raided".

Replacing a TV station's picture with output you want the
audience to see is more difficult to achieve than jamming.

Al-Manar TV has three satellite signals, one on ArabSat 2B
at 30.5 degrees east, one on Badr 3 at 26 degrees east and
one on NileSat 102 at 7 degrees west.

On Badr 3 and NileSat, al-Manar is broadcast alongside
other TV stations in a multiplexed or combined digital
signal.

While it would be technically feasible to replace one
station's output, all the other stations in the multiplex
would be taken off the air too. The technical parameters
of the original station would need to be exactly
duplicated by the interloper.

*



David Morgan \MAMS\
2006-07-29 15:04:44 EST

"Frank Arthur" <Art@Arthurian.com> wrote in message...

Oh come on Frank.... if you're trying to present another
view of the issue, posting the same thing 6 times only
says you're a bit short on information. Also, posting
binaries in a text group is wasting bandwidth and many
newsservers actually filter them out.

I appreciated the information... the FIRST time you posted it.

;-)




Stan De SD
2006-07-30 11:37:50 EST

"David Morgan (MAMS)" <mams@NOSPAm-a-m-s.com> wrote in message
news:6JNyg.633$ee1.430@trnddc06...
> Israeli Atrocity News Roundup - Jul 28, 2006
>
> Via NY Transfer News Collective * All the News that Doesn't Fit
>
> excerpted from Abunimah News - 28 July 2006
>
> 1) Israel murders woman aged 75, four others in occupied Gaza (R)
> 2) Israel army "ethicist": killing civilians, flattening towns "moral"
(JP)
> 3) Evidence enemy is using chemical arms in occupied Gaza (AFP)
> 4) Lebanon village struggles as food, medicine grow scarce (AFP)
> 5) 87 percent of Lebanese support Hizbullah resistance (CSM)
> 6) Invader will not allow UN to probe killing of observers in Lebanon (Ha)
> 7) Spineless Kofi Annan backs down as usual (Wash Times)
> 8) Israel reactivates collaborator radio, steps up black propaganda (BBC)

You have another source other than a known communist sympathizer website?



David Morgan \MAMS\
2006-07-30 15:28:44 EST

"Stan de SD" <standesd_DIGA_NO_A_SPAM@covad.net> wrote in message news:6463d$44ccd21b$45035f0d$7584@msgid.meganewsservers.com...
>
> "David Morgan (MAMS)" <mams@NOSPAm-a-m-s.com> wrote in message
> news:6JNyg.633$ee1.430@trnddc06...
> > Israeli Atrocity News Roundup - Jul 28, 2006
> >
> > Via NY Transfer News Collective * All the News that Doesn't Fit
> >
> > excerpted from Abunimah News - 28 July 2006
> >
> > 1) Israel murders woman aged 75, four others in occupied Gaza (R)
> > 2) Israel army "ethicist": killing civilians, flattening towns "moral" (JP)
> > 3) Evidence enemy is using chemical arms in occupied Gaza (AFP)
> > 4) Lebanon village struggles as food, medicine grow scarce (AFP)
> > 5) 87 percent of Lebanese support Hizbullah resistance (CSM)
> > 6) Invader will not allow UN to probe killing of observers in Lebanon (Ha)
> > 7) Spineless Kofi Annan backs down as usual (Wash Times)
> > 8) Israel reactivates collaborator radio, steps up black propaganda (BBC)

> You have another source other than a known communist sympathizer website?

Not that it really matters, Stan... but do you care to clarify 'communist
sympathizer' as it applies to the article's contributors, (BBC), (Wash Times),
(AFP), (Reuters) etc.??

I posted about ten articles over the past three days, solely for the purpose
of offering an alternative viewpoint to review and consider. Attacking the
source or the provider does not dispute the content, if that is your intention.




Stan De SD
2006-07-30 16:27:01 EST

"David Morgan (MAMS)" <mams@NOSPAm-a-m-s.com> wrote in message
news:ML7zg.1342$ee1.362@trnddc06...
>
> "Stan de SD" <standesd_DIGA_NO_A_SPAM@covad.net> wrote in message
news:6463d$44ccd21b$45035f0d$7584@msgid.meganewsservers.com...
> >
> > "David Morgan (MAMS)" <mams@NOSPAm-a-m-s.com> wrote in message
> > news:6JNyg.633$ee1.430@trnddc06...
> > > Israeli Atrocity News Roundup - Jul 28, 2006
> > >
> > > Via NY Transfer News Collective * All the News that Doesn't Fit
> > >
> > > excerpted from Abunimah News - 28 July 2006
> > >
> > > 1) Israel murders woman aged 75, four others in occupied Gaza (R)
> > > 2) Israel army "ethicist": killing civilians, flattening towns "moral"
(JP)
> > > 3) Evidence enemy is using chemical arms in occupied Gaza (AFP)
> > > 4) Lebanon village struggles as food, medicine grow scarce (AFP)
> > > 5) 87 percent of Lebanese support Hizbullah resistance (CSM)
> > > 6) Invader will not allow UN to probe killing of observers in Lebanon
(Ha)
> > > 7) Spineless Kofi Annan backs down as usual (Wash Times)
> > > 8) Israel reactivates collaborator radio, steps up black propaganda
(BBC)
>
> > You have another source other than a known communist sympathizer
website?
>
> Not that it really matters, Stan... but do you care to clarify 'communist
> sympathizer' as it applies to the article's contributors, (BBC), (Wash
Times),
> (AFP), (Reuters) etc.??
>
> I posted about ten articles over the past three days, solely for the
purpose
> of offering an alternative viewpoint to review and consider. Attacking
the
> source or the provider does not dispute the content, if that is your
intention.

Commie interpretation. As far as Israel killing Arab Muslims, I seem to
recall Arab Muslims continually professing their will to die in the name of
Jihad - so here's their chance.



David Morgan \MAMS\
2006-07-30 18:46:07 EST

"Stan de SD" <standesd_DIGA_NO_A_SPAM@covad.net> wrote in message...

> Commie interpretation.

What is a "commie" in relation to the BBC, Reuters, AP, Washinton Times ???

Sorry Stan... you're not very clear on this.




Stan De SD
2006-07-30 21:22:45 EST

"David Morgan (MAMS)" <mams@NOSPAm-a-m-s.com> wrote in message
news:PEazg.1363$ee1.177@trnddc06...
>
> "Stan de SD" <standesd_DIGA_NO_A_SPAM@covad.net> wrote in message...
>
> > Commie interpretation.
>
> What is a "commie" in relation to the BBC, Reuters, AP, Washinton Times
???

The usual left-wing sucking up to Islamopigs.



David Morgan \MAMS\
2006-07-30 22:00:18 EST

"Stan de SD" <standesd_DIGA_NO_A_SPAM@covad.net> wrote in message news:a42df$44cd5b31$45035f0d$26866@msgid.meganewsservers.com...
>
> "David Morgan (MAMS)" <mams@NOSPAm-a-m-s.com> wrote in message
> news:PEazg.1363$ee1.177@trnddc06...
> >
> > "Stan de SD" <standesd_DIGA_NO_A_SPAM@covad.net> wrote in message...
> >
> > > Commie interpretation.

> > What is a "commie" in relation to the BBC, Reuters, AP, Washington Times ???


> The usual left-wing sucking up to Islamopigs.


Ah, so you really don't understand communism as a form of government,
your own system of government, Islam as a religion, why it takes multiple
political parties to have a democracy, and you have no justifiable arguments
with the facts in the OP ??

You really haven't made any sense yet, Stan.... you're just calling names.






Stan De SD
2006-07-30 22:12:05 EST

"David Morgan (MAMS)" <mams@NOSPAm-a-m-s.com> wrote in message
news:Sudzg.1379$ee1.1271@trnddc06...
>
> "Stan de SD" <standesd_DIGA_NO_A_SPAM@covad.net> wrote in message
news:a42df$44cd5b31$45035f0d$26866@msgid.meganewsservers.com...
> >
> > "David Morgan (MAMS)" <mams@NOSPAm-a-m-s.com> wrote in message
> > news:PEazg.1363$ee1.177@trnddc06...
> > >
> > > "Stan de SD" <standesd_DIGA_NO_A_SPAM@covad.net> wrote in message...
> > >
> > > > Commie interpretation.
>
> > > What is a "commie" in relation to the BBC, Reuters, AP, Washington
Times ???
>
>
> > The usual left-wing sucking up to Islamopigs.
>
>
> Ah, so you really don't understand communism as a form of government,

I sure do - it's a totalitarian system that find scapegoats for it's own
failure and kills them, just like Naziism and Islamofascism. What a
coincidence...



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