Activism Discussion: Why Iraq Is Going To Iran And China To Rebuild Their Electrical Grid

Why Iraq Is Going To Iran And China To Rebuild Their Electrical Grid
Posts: 8

Report Abuse

Use this form to report abuse or request takedown.
The requests are usually processed within 48 hours.

Page: 1   (First | Last)

David Morgan \MAMS\
2007-10-28 04:07:18 EST

The New York Times - Oct 19, 2007
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/19/world/middleeast/19reconstruct.htm

Head of Reconstruction Teams in Iraq Reports Little Progress
Throughout Country

By JAMES GLANZ

BAGHDAD, Oct. 18 " Attempts by American-led reconstruction teams to
forge political reconciliation, foster economic growth and build an
effective police force and court system in Iraq have failed to show
significant progress in nearly every one of the nations provincial
regions and in the capital, a federal oversight agency reported on
Thursday.

The report, by the Office of the Special Inspector General for Iraq
Reconstruction, comes as the United States tries to take advantage of a
drop in overall violence to create a functioning government here.

The release of the report was linked to testimony on Thursday by the
special inspector general, Stuart W. Bowen Jr., before the Oversight
and Investigations Subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committee.

There are bright spots in the effort to put together a functioning
nation, Mr. Bowen found: economic growth in the Kurdish north; tribal
reconciliation in the western desert province of Anbar; and patchy
progress in the development of local governments. Beyond that, some of
the provinces are showing increasing ability to create plans, write
contracts and carry out construction projects to rebuild Iraqs
physical infrastructure, the report says.

A central finding of the report, Mr. Bowen said in his testimony, was
that even with 32 of the teams, called provincial reconstruction teams,
or P.R.T.s, now deployed around the country at a cost of $1.9 billion
as of August, the program still has not developed concrete methods to
measure the effects of the teams on progress in the country.

Mr. Bowen said his office had recommended a year ago that more definite
performance measures be put in place. I would like to have been able
to come today and tell you that those plans have been developed and
those metrics are being applied, but they havent, Mr. Bowen said,
according to a transcript of his remarks by the Federal News Service.

Still, the report did find that the teams had made incremental
progress in selected areas despite continuing political and ethnic
conflicts, as well as the difficult security situation.

The counselor for public affairs at the United States Embassy in
Baghdad, Philip T. Reeker, said, without specifying details, that the
embassy had some reservations about the way Mr. Bowens office had
gauged progress by the P.R.T.s in Iraq.

But Mr. Reeker added, We share many of the reports observations and
its assessment that P.R.T.s have achieved measurable progress in a
short period of time under very challenging circumstances.

The teams were assembled to promote reconciliation, support
counterinsurgency operations, foster development and build the capacity
of local officials to govern, Mr. Reeker said. Implementing
democratic, transparent governance takes time and requires long-term
commitment, he said.

Perhaps the most revealing information in the report emerges not from
the grading of the teams themselves, but in the extraordinary
geographic reach they provide in observing and assessing the current
state of play in the areas of politics, economics, security and the
rule of law in Iraq.

The report collected observations from most of the 32 teams, and pieced
together an almost encyclopedic view that has been sorely lacking as
both the American and Iraqi governments try to gauge how far the
country has come in binding its wounds, creating functioning
institutions and restoring services.

The picture that emerges is far from confidence-inspiring, and raises
the question of whether any Western program, no matter how well
founded, can overcome the challenges of putting Iraq back together
again.

Dividing the country into five regions in order to assess problems and
progress, the report gave, at best, mixed grades to all five.

In the northern provinces, the report found, efforts have failed to
significantly influence sectarian and tribal leaders to address the
issue of reconciliation. Uncertainty over the fate of the oil-rich
city of Kirkuk, which at some point must decide whether or not to join
the semiautonomous provinces in the far north, is casting a shadow
over the region, the report found.

In the center, where Baghdad is located, local institutions are taking
over functions once carried out by United States officials. But getting
Iraqis to take responsibility for maintaining facilities built by the
United States, like water treatment plants or office buildings,
remains a significant challenge, the report found.

In the province of Diyala, just to the east of Baghdad, there have been
moves toward reconciliation, but it will take years to overcome ill
will between tribes.

The provinces just to the south of Baghdad are economically stagnant
and in the southern provincial capital of Basra, the small- and
medium-size businesses that flourished before the 2003 invasion have
since withered.

Efforts to restart them are stymied by a lack of skill or interest,
the report found.

Even in Anbar, where the tribes have joined with the United States to
fight militants associated with Al Qaeda in Mesopotamia, a homegrown
Sunni extremist group that American intelligence agencies say is
foreign-led, a lack of fuel and reliable electricity is hindering
economic development, the report found.

In spite of those challenges, Mr. Reeker of the United States Embassy
said, the presence of the teams in the provinces to collect such
detailed information in a country still clouded by the fog of war is in
itself an advantage for the American effort here.

Reporting and analysis from the field makes a huge difference " that
we have people out in the field to do that, Mr. Reeker said.

Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company

*



Almond
2007-10-28 04:54:09 EST
Because it makes sense?


--
The most powerful Usenet tool you have ever heard of.
NewsMaestro v. 4.0.4 has been released.

Job list improvements for new installations having no jobs
to begin with.

In some previous releases some class files were missing.
As a result, the program would not run.
Sorry for the inconvenience.

Multi-job support and other important feature additions
and various improvements and optimizations.

Web page:
http://newsmaestro.sourceforge.net/

Download page:
http://newsmaestro.sourceforge.net/Download_Information.htm

Send any feedback to newsmaestroinfo@mail.ru.
Your personal info will not be released and your privacy
will be honored.



David Morgan \MAMS\
2007-10-28 05:18:50 EST

"Almond" <almond@brothers.orgy> wrote in...

> Because it makes sense?

It's quite certain that the money which America has paid, failed
miserably in getting the job done. But then again, the money lined
the pockets of those who played the game - and the game was to
wreak havok on Iraq, creating a helpless population... so one must
assume that the *real* job was done with some efficiency, regardless
of the cost to America, Americans, and the future economic state of
the nation.

--------------


The International Herald Tribune - Oct 18, 2007
http://www.iht.com/bin/printfriendly.php?id=7938736


Iraq awards contracts to Iran and China

By James Glanz

BAGHDAD: Iraq has agreed to award $1.1 billion in contracts to Iranian
and Chinese companies to build a pair of enormous power plants, the
Iraqi electricity minister said Tuesday. Word of the project prompted
serious concerns among American military officials, who fear that
Iranian commercial investments can mask military activities at a time
of heightened tension with Iran.

The Iraqi electricity minister, Karim Wahid, said that the Iranian
project would be built in Sadr City, a Shiite enclave in Baghdad that
is controlled by followers of the anti-American cleric Moktada al-Sadr.
He added that Iran had also agreed to provide cheap electricity from
its own grid to southern Iraq, and to build a large power plant
essentially free of charge in an area between the two southern Shiite
holy cities of Karbala and Najaf.

The expansion of ties between Iraq and Iran comes as the United States
and Iran clash on nuclear issues and about what American officials have
repeatedly said is Iranian support for armed groups in Iraq. American
officials have charged that Iranians, through the international
military wing known as the Quds Force, are particularly active in
support of elite elements of the Mahdi Army, a militia largely
controlled by Sadr.

An American military official in Baghdad said that while he had no
specific knowledge of the power plant contracts, any expansion of
Iranian interests was a concern for the military here.

"We are of course carefully watching Iran's overall presence here in
Iraq," the military official said. "As you know, it's not always as it
appears. Their Quds Force routinely uses the cover of a business to
mask their real purpose as an intelligence operative."

"This is a free marketplace, so there's not much we can do about it,"
the official said.

At the same time, it is possible to view Iranian and Chinese investment
as giving those countries a stake in Iraqi stability. The power plants
could also boost a troubled reconstruction effort in Iraq. An American
Embassy spokesman said, "We welcome any efforts to help develop Iraq's
energy infrastructure."

"These proposals reflect the ongoing business opportunities that are
arising in Iraq that American firms should be competing for," said the
spokesman, who asked not to be named because of standard protocol at
the embassy.

It was unclear whether any American firms had tried to win the work,
although Wahid said the projects had been submitted for bids. The
embassy spokesman said, "We are unaware of any violations of principles
of open and fair bidding."

The agreements between Iraq and Iran come after the American-led
reconstruction effort, which relied heavily on large American
contractors, has spent nearly $5 billion of United States taxpayer
money on Iraq's electricity grid. Aside from a few isolated bright
spots, there was little clear impact in a nation where in many places
electricity is still available only for a few hours each day. Because
the power plants are in largely Shiite-controlled areas, it is possible
they may not face the same sectarian violence that crippled so many
American rebuilding projects.

Wahid did not say how much the plant between Karbala and Najaf would
cost, but at standard international prices a plant of the scale he
described would be worth roughly $200 million to $300 million.

The outlines of all three agreements were confirmed by Thamir Ghadban,
an expert on energy who is also director of the committee of advisers
to Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki. But Ghadban said that the
granting of the huge projects to rivals of the United States was not an
indication that American companies were being excluded from
consideration now that Iraqi oil revenues, which provide the basis for
the Iraqi government's budget, are largely paying for the
reconstruction of the grid.

"There is no preference to the Iranians," Ghadban said, citing the most
obvious potential point of sensitivity for the United States. "There is
no opposition or stance from the Iraqi government to bar American or
Western companies. It is the other way around," Ghadban said,
indicating that he urged American contractors to bid for work in Iraq.

Of the two new projects Iraq has agreed to finance, Wahid said, the
largest is a $940 million power plant in Wasit to be built by a Chinese
company, which he said was named Shanghai Heavy Industry. That project
would pump some 1,300 megawatts of electricity into the Iraqi grid. For
comparison, all of the plants currently connected to Iraq's grid
produce a total of roughly 5,000 megawatts.

He said that Iraq had already spent $12 million leveling the ground in
preparation for the Chinese plant. The Sadr City project, which will
include a small refinery, will cost $150 million and be built by an
Iranian company, Sunir, Wahid said. That plant is expected to produce
about 160 megawatts of electricity.

The Iraqi Electricity Ministry, which Wahid heads, is one of the few in
the central government that has received praise for successfully
spending much of the money allocated to it in the Iraqi budget for
reconstruction projects. Because of security problems, a shortage of
officials who are skilled at writing and executing contracts, and
endemic corruption, many of the ministries have either left their
rebuilding money unspent or poured it into projects that have had a
marginal impact on the quality of life for Iraqi citizens.

Asked how he had managed to make progress within the bureaucratic
morass of much of the Iraqi government, Wahid said he had simply
learned to go it alone. Aside from financing, his main need from the
central government was guarantees that Iraqi security forces would
protect his workers and the electricity infrastructure.

"Do not annoy me," Wahid said was his main message to the government.
"Let me do my work."

Whether officials outside his government will be entirely pleased with
the deals is a separate question. An international energy expert
involved in Iraq's electricity sector said he understood that the Sadr
City project had originally been an Iranian initiative and that the
Electricity Ministry had shown little interest at first.

The expert also said that the Iraqi Commission on Public Integrity,
which investigates corruption, had already signaled that it would be
investigating the project. Officials at the commission could not be
reached for comment on Wednesday evening.

Wahid said the new power plants were part of a sweeping plan to
increase electricity production on the grid, whose output has been
creeping upward in recent weeks. He said that the ministry was in
discussions on building another large power plant, one that would
produce 600 megawatts, within the city of Karbala.

And the minister said that the first installment of another initiative
he had long discussed, bringing diesel-powered generators into selected
Baghdad neighborhoods, was close to having an impact.

Some 14 of the generators, each expected to produce 1.75 megawatts,
should be arriving in the capital within weeks, Wahid said.

Copyright (c) 2007 The International Herald Tribune


*



Almond
2007-10-28 19:41:08 EST
In article <_tYUi.222$a01.72@trnddc06>, "David Morgan \(MAMS\)" <findme@m-a-m-s.comC/Odm> wrote:
>
>"Almond" <almond@brothers.orgy> wrote in...
>
>> Because it makes sense?
>
>It's quite certain that the money which America has paid, failed
>miserably in getting the job done.

Which "job"?
Sucking money out of your wallets with the rate of black hole?

>But then again, the money lined
>the pockets of those who played the game - and the game was to
>wreak havok on Iraq, creating a helpless population...

Yep, and media is completely quiet about the utmost devastation
in Iraq. People starving to death, children getting on drugs,
medical facilities are virtual non existent and on and on and on.

>so one must
>assume that the *real* job was done with some efficiency, regardless
>of the cost to America, Americans, and the future economic state of
>the nation.

Well, depends on how you look at it and how much you know
of real agenda, and that takes time to study, and if you decide
to study it, you may get a gray hair in no time.

--
The most powerful Usenet tool you have ever heard of.
NewsMaestro v. 4.0.4 has been released.

Job list improvements for new installations having no jobs
to begin with.

In some previous releases some class files were missing.
As a result, the program would not run.
Sorry for the inconvenience.

Multi-job support and other important feature additions
and various improvements and optimizations.

Web page:
http://newsmaestro.sourceforge.net/

Download page:
http://newsmaestro.sourceforge.net/Download_Information.htm

Send any feedback to newsmaestroinfo@mail.ru.
Your personal info will not be released and your privacy
will be honored.



David Morgan \MAMS\
2007-10-30 18:28:37 EST

"Almond" <almond@brothers.orgy> wrote in message...

> Because it makes sense?

I guess so... we've screwed them long enough.

Here's another $100 Million being diverted away from the US....



The Washington Post - Oct 4, 2007
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/10/03/AR2007100302464.html?nav=rss_world

Iraqis to Pay China $100 Million for Weapons for Police;
Experts Fear More Will Go to Insurgents

By Robin Wright and Ann Scott Tyson
Washington Post Staff Writers

Iraq has ordered $100 million worth of light military equipment from
China for its police force, contending that the United States was
unable to provide the materiel and is too slow to deliver arms
shipments, Iraqi President Jalal Talabani said yesterday.

The China deal, not previously made public, has alarmed military
analysts who note that Iraq's security forces already are unable to
account for more than 190,000 weapons supplied by the United States,
many of which are believed to be in the hands of Shiite and Sunni
militias, insurgents and other forces seeking to destabilize Iraq and
target U.S. troops.

"The problem is that the Iraqi government doesn't have -- as yet -- a
clear plan for making sure that weapons are distributed, that they are
properly monitored and repeatedly checked," said Rachel Stohl of the
Center for Defense Information, an independent think tank. "The end-use
monitoring will be left in the hands of a government and military in
Iraq that is not yet ready for it. And there's not a way for the U.S.
to mandate them to do it if they're not U.S. weapons."

News of Iraq's arms deal came as Army Lt. Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, the
top U.S. commander for day-to-day operations in Iraq, told editors and
reporters at The Washington Post yesterday that he expects a U.S. troop
presence will be required in the country for a minimum of "at least
three to five more years" and will involve 25,000 to 50,000 troops,
depending on security conditions.

Detailed planning is underway for the U.S. military to begin scaling
back its primary mission from one of fighting a counterinsurgency to an
advisory and training role, which will involve pulling U.S. troops out
of Iraqi cities and closing some U.S. bases, Odierno said. Odierno and
Talabani, who met separately with Post editors and reporters, said they
expect their governments to finalize a long-term bilateral security
pact in 2008.

The capabilities of Iraqi security forces are pivotal to the U.S. exit
strategy in Iraq, with the creation of a viable police force critical
to reconciliation. Talabani said only one in five Iraqi police officers
is armed and called for faster weapons delivery from the United States
to beef up Iraq's fledgling army.

Iraq's police force is noted for infiltration by militias and
insurgents out to use national resources for their own ends, said
William D. Hartung, director of the New America Foundation Arms and
Security Initiative. "Besides, aside from possibly wanting newer
models, there are piles of arms and weapons floating around in Iraq,"
he said.

The Chinese arms deal sheds light on the larger dispute between the
United States and Iraq over rebuilding Iraq's armed forces and police.
Iraqi officials have long complained about the supply of weapons and
equipment for their personnel, noting that Iraqi security forces often
patrol in pickup trucks without body armor along the same routes as
U.S. troops wearing flak jackets and riding in armored vehicles.

"There is general frustration in the Iraqi government at the rate in
which Iraqi armed forces are being equipped and armed," Iraqi
Ambassador Samir Sumaidaie told reporters this summer. "This is a
collaborative effort between the Iraqi government and the government of
the United States, and the process is not moving quickly enough to
improve the fighting capacity of Iraqi armed forces. A way must be
found to improve this process."

Talabani yesterday expressed frustration with the delays. "The capacity
of the factories here are not enough to provide us quickly with all
that we need, even for the army. One of our demands is to accelerate
the delivery of the arms to the Iraqi army."

Iraq has become one of the largest buyers of U.S.-made weapons. Army
Gen. David H. Petraeus, the top U.S. commander in Iraq, told the Senate
Armed Services Committee last month that Baghdad has signed deals to
buy $1.6 billion in U.S. arms, with another $1.8 billion in possible
weapons purchases.

Pentagon spokesman Bryan Whitman said the United States is "working
closely" to help Iraq obtain "appropriate and necessary" military
equipment. But U.S. officials concede delivery problems.

"We haven't converted toaster factories to produce carbines and we're
working hard just to supply our own troops," said an administration
official involved with Iraq policy. "Our factories are working for our
own troops. So it's true we don't have the ability to provide these
rifles and other equipment they're looking for."

In 2004 and 2005, the United States bought 185,000 AK-47s from an
Eastern European country -- after Iraqis rejected U.S.-made M-16
assault rifles -- as part of a $2.8 billion program to deliver military
equipment to Iraq. But a recent Government Accountability Office report
said that 110,000 of them were unaccounted for, with about 30 percent
of all arms distributed to Iraqi forces by the United States since 2004
missing.

Nevertheless, Odierno said, recent improvements in Iraq's security
since the U.S. troop buildup have exceeded his expectations, with
attacks down in September to the lowest level since January 2006 and
U.S. troop casualties declining since June. A major factor has been
U.S. operations against al-Qaeda in Iraq, whose sanctuaries have been
reduced by 60 to 70 percent since January, he said. He warned, however,
that the group can regenerate.

Another factor has been the unexpected willingness of Sunni tribes to
cooperate with U.S. and Iraqi forces, he said. But Odierno said he
remains concerned over recent statements from Iraq's Shiite ruling
faction demanding that the U.S. military stop recruiting Sunni
tribesmen f0r Iraq's police force.

"That's uncomfortable to them, and I think that's part of why it's so
important. This is about reconciliation," Odierno said. "We have to
continue to move forward."

He said the U.S. military is shifting more of its resources to
targeting Shiite militias, including what Odierno called "surrogates"
who are trained, armed and funded by Iran, as well as "special groups"
affiliated with the Mahdi Army of Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr.

"We are starting to see at low levels a split between those [Shiite
militias] who have some relationship with Iran . . . and those who do
not," Odierno said. He said the significance of the "fissures" is not
yet clear.

[Staff writer Dafna Linzer contributed to this report.]
*





Almond
2007-10-30 19:55:09 EST
In article <peOVi.768$a01.193@trnddc06>, "David Morgan \(MAMS\)" <findme@m-a-m-s.comC/Odm> wrote:
>
>"Almond" <almond@brothers.orgy> wrote in message...
>
>> Because it makes sense?
>
>I guess so... we've screwed them long enough.
>
>Here's another $100 Million being diverted away from the US....

A stinky $100mils?

Do you think the Skull and Bones care about THAT kinda money?
Especially when they are coming out of YOUR pocket?

How bout trillions of YOUR bux to finance THEIR agenda?

Think again.

>The Washington Post - Oct 4, 2007
>http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/10/03/AR2007100302464
>.html?nav=rss_world
>
>Iraqis to Pay China $100 Million for Weapons for Police;
>Experts Fear More Will Go to Insurgents
>
>By Robin Wright and Ann Scott Tyson
>Washington Post Staff Writers
>
>Iraq has ordered $100 million worth of light military equipment from
>China for its police force, contending that the United States was
>unable to provide the materiel and is too slow to deliver arms
>shipments, Iraqi President Jalal Talabani said yesterday.
>
>The China deal, not previously made public, has alarmed military
>analysts who note that Iraq's security forces already are unable to
>account for more than 190,000 weapons supplied by the United States,
>many of which are believed to be in the hands of Shiite and Sunni
>militias, insurgents and other forces seeking to destabilize Iraq and
>target U.S. troops.
>
>"The problem is that the Iraqi government doesn't have -- as yet -- a
>clear plan for making sure that weapons are distributed, that they are
>properly monitored and repeatedly checked," said Rachel Stohl of the
>Center for Defense Information, an independent think tank. "The end-use
>monitoring will be left in the hands of a government and military in
>Iraq that is not yet ready for it. And there's not a way for the U.S.
>to mandate them to do it if they're not U.S. weapons."
>
>News of Iraq's arms deal came as Army Lt. Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, the
>top U.S. commander for day-to-day operations in Iraq, told editors and
>reporters at The Washington Post yesterday that he expects a U.S. troop
>presence will be required in the country for a minimum of "at least
>three to five more years" and will involve 25,000 to 50,000 troops,
>depending on security conditions.
>
>Detailed planning is underway for the U.S. military to begin scaling
>back its primary mission from one of fighting a counterinsurgency to an
>advisory and training role, which will involve pulling U.S. troops out
>of Iraqi cities and closing some U.S. bases, Odierno said. Odierno and
>Talabani, who met separately with Post editors and reporters, said they
>expect their governments to finalize a long-term bilateral security
>pact in 2008.
>
>The capabilities of Iraqi security forces are pivotal to the U.S. exit
>strategy in Iraq, with the creation of a viable police force critical
>to reconciliation. Talabani said only one in five Iraqi police officers
>is armed and called for faster weapons delivery from the United States
>to beef up Iraq's fledgling army.
>
>Iraq's police force is noted for infiltration by militias and
>insurgents out to use national resources for their own ends, said
>William D. Hartung, director of the New America Foundation Arms and
>Security Initiative. "Besides, aside from possibly wanting newer
>models, there are piles of arms and weapons floating around in Iraq,"
>he said.
>
>The Chinese arms deal sheds light on the larger dispute between the
>United States and Iraq over rebuilding Iraq's armed forces and police.
>Iraqi officials have long complained about the supply of weapons and
>equipment for their personnel, noting that Iraqi security forces often
>patrol in pickup trucks without body armor along the same routes as
>U.S. troops wearing flak jackets and riding in armored vehicles.
>
>"There is general frustration in the Iraqi government at the rate in
>which Iraqi armed forces are being equipped and armed," Iraqi
>Ambassador Samir Sumaidaie told reporters this summer. "This is a
>collaborative effort between the Iraqi government and the government of
>the United States, and the process is not moving quickly enough to
>improve the fighting capacity of Iraqi armed forces. A way must be
>found to improve this process."
>
>Talabani yesterday expressed frustration with the delays. "The capacity
>of the factories here are not enough to provide us quickly with all
>that we need, even for the army. One of our demands is to accelerate
>the delivery of the arms to the Iraqi army."
>
>Iraq has become one of the largest buyers of U.S.-made weapons. Army
>Gen. David H. Petraeus, the top U.S. commander in Iraq, told the Senate
>Armed Services Committee last month that Baghdad has signed deals to
>buy $1.6 billion in U.S. arms, with another $1.8 billion in possible
>weapons purchases.
>
>Pentagon spokesman Bryan Whitman said the United States is "working
>closely" to help Iraq obtain "appropriate and necessary" military
>equipment. But U.S. officials concede delivery problems.
>
>"We haven't converted toaster factories to produce carbines and we're
>working hard just to supply our own troops," said an administration
>official involved with Iraq policy. "Our factories are working for our
>own troops. So it's true we don't have the ability to provide these
>rifles and other equipment they're looking for."
>
>In 2004 and 2005, the United States bought 185,000 AK-47s from an
>Eastern European country -- after Iraqis rejected U.S.-made M-16
>assault rifles -- as part of a $2.8 billion program to deliver military
>equipment to Iraq. But a recent Government Accountability Office report
>said that 110,000 of them were unaccounted for, with about 30 percent
>of all arms distributed to Iraqi forces by the United States since 2004
>missing.
>
>Nevertheless, Odierno said, recent improvements in Iraq's security
>since the U.S. troop buildup have exceeded his expectations, with
>attacks down in September to the lowest level since January 2006 and
>U.S. troop casualties declining since June. A major factor has been
>U.S. operations against al-Qaeda in Iraq, whose sanctuaries have been
>reduced by 60 to 70 percent since January, he said. He warned, however,
>that the group can regenerate.
>
>Another factor has been the unexpected willingness of Sunni tribes to
>cooperate with U.S. and Iraqi forces, he said. But Odierno said he
>remains concerned over recent statements from Iraq's Shiite ruling
>faction demanding that the U.S. military stop recruiting Sunni
>tribesmen f0r Iraq's police force.
>
>"That's uncomfortable to them, and I think that's part of why it's so
>important. This is about reconciliation," Odierno said. "We have to
>continue to move forward."
>
>He said the U.S. military is shifting more of its resources to
>targeting Shiite militias, including what Odierno called "surrogates"
>who are trained, armed and funded by Iran, as well as "special groups"
>affiliated with the Mahdi Army of Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr.
>
>"We are starting to see at low levels a split between those [Shiite
>militias] who have some relationship with Iran . . . and those who do
>not," Odierno said. He said the significance of the "fissures" is not
>yet clear.
>
>[Staff writer Dafna Linzer contributed to this report.]
> *
>
>
>
>

--
The most powerful Usenet tool you have ever heard of.
NewsMaestro v. 4.0.5 - Way Too Cool has been released.

Automatic enablement of all buttons, checkboxes and fields
depending on operation.
Templates generator improvements.

Job list improvements for new installations having no jobs
to begin with.

In some previous releases some class files were missing.
As a result, the program would not run.
Sorry for the inconvenience.

Multi-job support and other important feature additions
and various improvements and optimizations.

Web page:
http://newsmaestro.sourceforge.net/

Download page:
http://newsmaestro.sourceforge.net/Download_Information.htm

Send any feedback to newsmaestroinfo \at/ mail.ru.
Your personal info will not be released and your privacy
will be honored.



David Morgan \MAMS\
2007-10-31 02:43:26 EST

"Almond" <almond@brothers.orgy> wrote in message...

> >Here's another $100 Million being diverted away from the US....

> A stinky $100mils?

> Think again.


I don't know what side of the bed you got up on this morning,
but I was merely noting that some US arms manufacturer is
$100 MILLION poorer today and China is $100 Million richer.
Ya' think the Neo-Con are finally pissing off the very guys they
installed as "leaders" in Iraq?

BTW,
Is there some particular reason that your numb ass thinks it
to be an intelligent move to attempt to steer posted replies to
alt.usenet.kooks and alt.slack ? That doesn't say much for
your level of concern OR brainpower. You take my links, you
archive my posts, you indulge my interest in squelching the
the Neo-Con, then you tell me I'm an idiot. WTF ?







"The most pathetic person in the world is someone who has sight
but has no vision."
-- Helen Keller






Almond
2007-10-31 02:53:09 EST
In article <iuVVi.1038$a01.238@trnddc06>, "David Morgan \(MAMS\)" <findme@m-a-m-s.comC/Odm> wrote:
>
>"Almond" <almond@brothers.orgy> wrote in message...
>
>> >Here's another $100 Million being diverted away from the US....
>
>> A stinky $100mils?
>
>> Think again.
>
>
>I don't know what side of the bed you got up on this morning,
>but I was merely noting that some US arms manufacturer is
>$100 MILLION poorer today and China is $100 Million richer.

What does it matter?

--
The most powerful Usenet tool you have ever heard of.
NewsMaestro v. 4.0.5 - Way Too Cool has been released.

Automatic enablement of all buttons, checkboxes and fields
depending on operation.
Templates generator improvements.

Job list improvements for new installations having no jobs
to begin with.

In some previous releases some class files were missing.
As a result, the program would not run.
Sorry for the inconvenience.

Multi-job support and other important feature additions
and various improvements and optimizations.

Web page:
http://newsmaestro.sourceforge.net/

Download page:
http://newsmaestro.sourceforge.net/Download_Information.htm

Send any feedback to newsmaestroinfo \at/ mail.ru.
Your personal info will not be released and your privacy
will be honored.


Page: 1   (First | Last)


2021 - UsenetArchives.com | Contact Us | Privacy | Stats | Site Search
Become our Patron