Activism Discussion: Possible Future American President Plagiarized Speech From Wikipedia

Possible Future American President Plagiarized Speech From Wikipedia
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NewsToBeRead
2008-08-11 20:09:10 EST
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/08/11/did-mccain-plagiarize-his_n_118207.html

Did McCain Plagiarize His Georgia Speech From Wikipedia?

A Wikipedia editor notices some similarities between Sen. John McCain's
speech today on the crisis in Georgia and the Wikipedia article on the
country Georgia. They appear similar enough that most people would consider
parts of McCain's speech to be derived from Wikipedia.

http://blogs.cqpolitics.com/politicalinsider/2008/08/did-mccain-plagarize-his-speec.html

Wikipedia editor emailed Political Wire to point out some similarities
between Sen. John McCain's speech today on the crisis in Georgia and the
Wikipedia article on the country Georgia. Given the closeness of the words
and sentence structure, most would consider parts of McCain's speech to be
derived directly from Wikipedia.

First instance:


one of the first countries in the world to adopt Christianity as an
official religion (Wikipedia)

vs.

one of the world's first nations to adopt Christianity as an official
religion (McCain)


Second instance:


After the Russian Revolution of 1917, Georgia had a brief period of
independence as a Democratic Republic (1918-1921), which was terminated by
the Red Army invasion of Georgia. Georgia became part of the Soviet Union in
1922 and regained its independence in 1991. Early post-Soviet years was
marked by a civil unrest and economic crisis. (Wikipedia)

vs.

After a brief period of independence following the Russian revolution, the
Red Army forced Georgia to join the Soviet Union in 1922. As the Soviet
Union crumbled at the end of the Cold War, Georgia regained its independence
in 1991, but its early years were marked by instability, corruption, and
economic crises. (McCain)


Third instance:


In 2003, Shevardnadze (who won reelection in 2000) was deposed by the Rose
Revolution, after Georgian opposition and international monitors asserted
that the 2 November parliamentary elections were marred by fraud. The
revolution was led by Mikheil Saakashvili, Zurab Zhvania and Nino
Burjanadze, former members and leaders of Shavarnadze's ruling party.
Mikheil Saakashvili was elected as President of Georgia in 2004. Following
the Rose Revolution, a series of reforms was launched to strengthen the
country's military and economic capabilities. (Wikipedia)

vs.

Following fraudulent parliamentary elections in 2003, a peaceful,
democratic revolution took place, led by the U.S.-educated lawyer Mikheil
Saakashvili. The Rose Revolution changed things dramatically and, following
his election, President Saakashvili embarked on a series of wide-ranging and
successful reforms. (McCain)


Granted the third instance isn't as close as the first two, which seem quite
obviously taken from Wikipedia.

It should be noted that Wikipedia material can be freely used but always
requires attribution under its terms of use. Whether a presidential
candidate should base policy speeches on material from Wikipedia is another
question entirely.

See also: Dan Conley on how the candidates are reacting to the crisis in
Georgia.



Villanova
2008-08-11 21:17:56 EST
NewsToBeRead wrote:
> http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/08/11/did-mccain-plagiarize-his_n_118207.html
>
> Did McCain Plagiarize His Georgia Speech From Wikipedia?
>
> A Wikipedia editor notices some similarities between Sen. John McCain's
> speech today on the crisis in Georgia and the Wikipedia article on the
> country Georgia. They appear similar enough that most people would consider
> parts of McCain's speech to be derived from Wikipedia.
>
> http://blogs.cqpolitics.com/politicalinsider/2008/08/did-mccain-plagarize-his-speec.html
>
> Wikipedia editor emailed Political Wire to point out some similarities
> between Sen. John McCain's speech today on the crisis in Georgia and the
> Wikipedia article on the country Georgia. Given the closeness of the words
> and sentence structure, most would consider parts of McCain's speech to be
> derived directly from Wikipedia.
>
> First instance:
>
>
> one of the first countries in the world to adopt Christianity as an
> official religion (Wikipedia)
>
> vs.
>
> one of the world's first nations to adopt Christianity as an official
> religion (McCain)
>
>
> Second instance:
>
>
> After the Russian Revolution of 1917, Georgia had a brief period of
> independence as a Democratic Republic (1918-1921), which was terminated by
> the Red Army invasion of Georgia. Georgia became part of the Soviet Union in
> 1922 and regained its independence in 1991. Early post-Soviet years was
> marked by a civil unrest and economic crisis. (Wikipedia)
>
> vs.
>
> After a brief period of independence following the Russian revolution, the
> Red Army forced Georgia to join the Soviet Union in 1922. As the Soviet
> Union crumbled at the end of the Cold War, Georgia regained its independence
> in 1991, but its early years were marked by instability, corruption, and
> economic crises. (McCain)
>
>
> Third instance:
>
>
> In 2003, Shevardnadze (who won reelection in 2000) was deposed by the Rose
> Revolution, after Georgian opposition and international monitors asserted
> that the 2 November parliamentary elections were marred by fraud. The
> revolution was led by Mikheil Saakashvili, Zurab Zhvania and Nino
> Burjanadze, former members and leaders of Shavarnadze's ruling party.
> Mikheil Saakashvili was elected as President of Georgia in 2004. Following
> the Rose Revolution, a series of reforms was launched to strengthen the
> country's military and economic capabilities. (Wikipedia)
>
> vs.
>
> Following fraudulent parliamentary elections in 2003, a peaceful,
> democratic revolution took place, led by the U.S.-educated lawyer Mikheil
> Saakashvili. The Rose Revolution changed things dramatically and, following
> his election, President Saakashvili embarked on a series of wide-ranging and
> successful reforms. (McCain)
>
>
> Granted the third instance isn't as close as the first two, which seem quite
> obviously taken from Wikipedia.
>
> It should be noted that Wikipedia material can be freely used but always
> requires attribution under its terms of use. Whether a presidential
> candidate should base policy speeches on material from Wikipedia is another
> question entirely.
>
> See also: Dan Conley on how the candidates are reacting to the crisis in
> Georgia.
>
>



McCain is lucky in the sense he is not a brown srilankan Muralitharan.

Imagine how many times Crapats would have abused McCain to be a cheat
if he is.

ROFLMAO


--
posted via www.usenetfast.com - Fastest downloads from $4.50/month !

Michael Anselmo
2008-08-12 09:02:06 EST

"NewsToBeRead" <NewsToBeRead@USA.Com> wrote in message
news:48a0cdb3$0$28905$88260bb3@news.teranews.com...
> http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/08/11/did-mccain-plagiarize-his_n_118207.html
>
> Did McCain Plagiarize His Georgia Speech From Wikipedia?
>
> A Wikipedia editor notices some similarities between Sen. John McCain's
> speech today on the crisis in Georgia and the Wikipedia article on the
> country Georgia. They appear similar enough that most people would
> consider parts of McCain's speech to be derived from Wikipedia.
>
> http://blogs.cqpolitics.com/politicalinsider/2008/08/did-mccain-plagarize-his-speec.html
>
> Wikipedia editor emailed Political Wire to point out some similarities
> between Sen. John McCain's speech today on the crisis in Georgia and the
> Wikipedia article on the country Georgia. Given the closeness of the words
> and sentence structure, most would consider parts of McCain's speech to be
> derived directly from Wikipedia.
>
> First instance:
>
>
> one of the first countries in the world to adopt Christianity as an
> official religion (Wikipedia)
>
> vs.
>
> one of the world's first nations to adopt Christianity as an official
> religion (McCain)
>

>From http://www.georgiatogeorgia.org/GeorgiaHistory.html

Religion


Georgia, in the 4th century, was one of the first nations to adopt
Christianity as their national religion. Since adopting Christianity, the
Georgian Orthodox Church has been the mainstay and focus for the Georgian
people and their nation throughout their turbulent history. Today, the
Church still plays an important role in modern society.









>
> Second instance:
>
>
> After the Russian Revolution of 1917, Georgia had a brief period of
> independence as a Democratic Republic (1918-1921), which was terminated by
> the Red Army invasion of Georgia. Georgia became part of the Soviet Union
> in 1922 and regained its independence in 1991. Early post-Soviet years was
> marked by a civil unrest and economic crisis. (Wikipedia)
>
> vs.
>
> After a brief period of independence following the Russian revolution,
> the Red Army forced Georgia to join the Soviet Union in 1922. As the
> Soviet Union crumbled at the end of the Cold War, Georgia regained its
> independence in 1991, but its early years were marked by instability,
> corruption, and economic crises. (McCain)
>


Do a search on the phrase "After the Russian Revolution of 1917, Georgia"
and see what you get. Google gave me 740 hits. Most were news, many were
not. Yahoo was 250.

Also see:
http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/world/georgia-a-eurasian-country-celebrates-its-17th-independence-day_10052937.html

Also see:http://www.answers.com/topic/georgia You will see many sources
using the same wording.


>
> Third instance:
>
>
> In 2003, Shevardnadze (who won reelection in 2000) was deposed by the
> Rose Revolution, after Georgian opposition and international monitors
> asserted that the 2 November parliamentary elections were marred by fraud.
> The revolution was led by Mikheil Saakashvili, Zurab Zhvania and Nino
> Burjanadze, former members and leaders of Shavarnadze's ruling party.
> Mikheil Saakashvili was elected as President of Georgia in 2004. Following
> the Rose Revolution, a series of reforms was launched to strengthen the
> country's military and economic capabilities. (Wikipedia)
>
> vs.
>
> Following fraudulent parliamentary elections in 2003, a peaceful,
> democratic revolution took place, led by the U.S.-educated lawyer Mikheil
> Saakashvili. The Rose Revolution changed things dramatically and,
> following his election, President Saakashvili embarked on a series of
> wide-ranging and successful reforms. (McCain)
>

No response required.


>
> Granted the third instance isn't as close as the first two, which seem
> quite obviously taken from Wikipedia.
>
> It should be noted that Wikipedia material can be freely used but always
> requires attribution under its terms of use. Whether a presidential
> candidate should base policy speeches on material from Wikipedia is
> another question entirely.
>
> See also: Dan Conley on how the candidates are reacting to the crisis in
> Georgia.
>
>



John B.
2008-08-12 11:48:55 EST
On Aug 11, 8:09 pm, "NewsToBeRead" <NewsToBeR...@USA.Com> wrote:
> http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/08/11/did-mccain-plagiarize-his_n_...
>
> Did McCain Plagiarize His Georgia Speech From Wikipedia?
>
> A Wikipedia editor notices some similarities between Sen. John McCain's
> speech today on the crisis in Georgia and the Wikipedia article on the
> country Georgia. They appear similar enough that most people would consider
> parts of McCain's speech to be derived from Wikipedia.
>
> http://blogs.cqpolitics.com/politicalinsider/2008/08/did-mccain-plaga...
>
>  Wikipedia editor emailed Political Wire to point out some similarities
> between Sen. John McCain's speech today on the crisis in Georgia and the
> Wikipedia article on the country Georgia. Given the closeness of the words
> and sentence structure, most would consider parts of McCain's speech to be
> derived directly from Wikipedia.
>
> First instance:
>
>   one of the first countries in the world to adopt Christianity as an
> official religion (Wikipedia)
>
>   vs.
>
>   one of the world's first nations to adopt Christianity as an official
> religion (McCain)
>
> Second instance:
>
>   After the Russian Revolution of 1917, Georgia had a brief period of
> independence as a Democratic Republic (1918-1921), which was terminated by
> the Red Army invasion of Georgia. Georgia became part of the Soviet Union in
> 1922 and regained its independence in 1991. Early post-Soviet years was
> marked by a civil unrest and economic crisis. (Wikipedia)
>
>   vs.
>
>   After a brief period of independence following the Russian revolution, the
> Red Army forced Georgia to join the Soviet Union in 1922. As the Soviet
> Union crumbled at the end of the Cold War, Georgia regained its independence
> in 1991, but its early years were marked by instability, corruption, and
> economic crises. (McCain)
>
> Third instance:
>
>   In 2003, Shevardnadze (who won reelection in 2000) was deposed by the Rose
> Revolution, after Georgian opposition and international monitors asserted
> that the 2 November parliamentary elections were marred by fraud. The
> revolution was led by Mikheil Saakashvili, Zurab Zhvania and Nino
> Burjanadze, former members and leaders of Shavarnadze's ruling party.
> Mikheil Saakashvili was elected as President of Georgia in 2004. Following
> the Rose Revolution, a series of reforms was launched to strengthen the
> country's military and economic capabilities. (Wikipedia)
>
>   vs.
>
>   Following fraudulent parliamentary elections in 2003, a peaceful,
> democratic revolution took place, led by the U.S.-educated lawyer Mikheil
> Saakashvili. The Rose Revolution changed things dramatically and, following
> his election, President Saakashvili embarked on a series of wide-ranging and
> successful reforms. (McCain)
>
> Granted the third instance isn't as close as the first two, which seem quite
> obviously taken from Wikipedia.
>
> It should be noted that Wikipedia material can be freely used but always
> requires attribution under its terms of use. Whether a presidential
> candidate should base policy speeches on material from Wikipedia is another
> question entirely.
>
> See also: Dan Conley on how the candidates are reacting to the crisis in
> Georgia.

You can't really call this plagiarism, because Wikipedia is not a
copyrighted site. It's obvious that McCain's speechwriter didn't know
anything about Georgia and went to Wikipedia for background info.
Nothing wrong with that, but he should have rewritten it in his own
words, rather than cutting and pasting it.

Annika1980
2008-08-12 13:42:42 EST
On Aug 12, 11:48 am, "John B." <johnb...@gmail.com> wrote:

> You can't really call this plagiarism, because Wikipedia is not a
> copyrighted site. It's obvious that McCain's speechwriter didn't know
> anything about Georgia and went to Wikipedia for background info.
> Nothing wrong with that, but he should have rewritten it in his own
> words, rather than cutting and pasting it.

At least it wasn't Bush. When he heard the Georgia capital was under
seige he sent troops to Atlanta.


A*@borg.org
2008-08-12 14:28:29 EST

On 12-Aug-2008, annika1980 <annika1980@aol.com> wrote:

> At least it wasn't Bush. When he heard the Georgia capital was under
> seige he sent troops to Atlanta.

I just hope it isn't the dreaded Gen Shermaninov leading the Russian
columns, if so, I'm going to retired's place for a few weeks!

--
bill-o
Play the ball as it lies.
Play the course as you find it.
And if you can\ufffdt do either, do what is fair.

A*@borg.org
2008-08-12 14:31:27 EST

On 12-Aug-2008, "Michael Anselmo" <manselmo41@comcast.net> wrote:

> Do a search on the phrase "After the Russian Revolution of 1917, Georgia"
> and see what you get. Google gave me 740 hits. Most were news, many were
> not. Yahoo was 250.

Well, Goergia gave us Stalin, so it does have that going for it.....which is
nice! ^o)

--
bill-o
Play the ball as it lies.
Play the course as you find it.
And if you can\ufffdt do either, do what is fair.

\R&B\
2008-08-12 22:41:23 EST
"annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com> wrote
>
> At least it wasn't Bush. When he heard the Georgia capital was
> under seige he sent troops to Atlanta.


Bush could no longer name a state capital (other than possibly Texas) than
he could recite all the winners of Wimbledon in sequence.

Randy



Noons
2008-08-13 10:49:56 EST
"R&B" wrote,on my timestamp of 13/08/2008 12:41 PM:

>
> Bush could no longer name a state capital (other than possibly Texas) than
> he could recite all the winners of Wimbledon in sequence.

you mean he'd be naming the winners of this one?:
http://www.rent.com/rentals/north-carolina/wilmington-and-vicinity/wilmington/wimbledon-chase/431157/

Michael Anselmo
2008-08-13 15:59:04 EST

"Noons" <wizofoz2k@yahoo.com.au> wrote in message
news:g7usak$heh$1@registered.motzarella.org...
> "R&B" wrote,on my timestamp of 13/08/2008 12:41 PM:
>
>>
>> Bush could no longer name a state capital (other than possibly Texas)
>> than he could recite all the winners of Wimbledon in sequence.
>
> you mean he'd be naming the winners of this one?:
> http://www.rent.com/rentals/north-carolina/wilmington-and-vicinity/wilmington/wimbledon-chase/431157/




I'll bet Bush cannot name all 57 state capitals.


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