Activism Discussion: Phil Donahue: "We Have An Emergency In The Media And We Have To Fix It"

Phil Donahue: "We Have An Emergency In The Media And We Have To Fix It"
Posts: 7

Report Abuse

Use this form to report abuse or request takedown.
The requests are usually processed within 48 hours.

Page: 1   (First | Last)

I*@economicdemocracy.org
2005-03-24 13:35:53 EST
"AMY GOODMAN: Well, we all learned about this memo, just soon after you
were fired that came out of NBC, that was -- that said that as we led
into the invasion of Iraq, they didn't want to have their flagship
show, no matter how successful it was, the most popular show on MSNBC,
being one that provided a forum for anti-war voices. They didn't want
[inclusion of] anti-war [voice] when the other networks were waving
the [pro-war] flag"

= = = =

Thursday, March 24th, 2005
Phil Donahue: "We Have an Emergency in the Media and We Have to Fix It"

Listen to Segment || Download Show mp3
Watch 128k stream Watch 256k stream Read Transcript

Phil Donahue - one of the best-known talk show hosts in the history of
television in the United States - joins us in our firehouse studio to
discuss the state of the media in this country. Donahue's show was on
the air for more than 29 years. In 2003, he was fired by MSNBC because
he was allowing antiwar voices on the air. [includes rush transcript -
partial]

= = =

Before Jerry Springer created a show that looked more like a wrestling
match than a talk show; before Oprah was a household name and before
the explosion of cable news networks and the 24 hour talk show cycle,
there was a daily program that millions tuned into every week for a
national discussion on a wide range of social, political and personal
issues. The show was simply called "Donahue" and was hosted by a
bespectacled man with silver hair who would run around the studio
handing the microphone to members of the audience to give them their
say on the issues of the day. For many people watching or listening
right now, it is probably unnecessary to say that that man was Phil
Donahue. Throughout the 1980s, he was probably one of the most trusted
personalities in this country.

Donahue first took to the airwaves in 1965. He hosted his radio program
"Conversation Piece" in Dayton, Ohio. Two years later on November 6,
The Donahue Show premiered on television with atheist Madalyn Murray
O'Hair as its first guest. During the 1992 Presidential campaign,
Donahue was credited with expanding the role of daytime television by
featuring an unprecedented debate between then-candidates Bill Clinton
and Jerry Brown. "The Donahue Show" was on the air for 29 years. In
that time, Phil Donahue hosted more than 6,000 shows.

After years of being away from hosting that daily, national discussion,
Donahue returned to TV in 2002 as the host of a nightly debate-style
program on MSNBC. For many people, the show was a much-needed breath of
fresh air on the cable networks, increasingly dominated by right-wing
pundits and media personalities. Antiwar voices long kept off these
cable news channels were suddenly given a seat in the forbidden studios
to take part in a national debate about the so-called war on terror.

Here's an example - this was in the lead-up to the invasion of Iraq.

* Phil Donahue on MSNBC interviewing Harry Belafonte.

Donahue was on in the same time slot as Fox's Bill O"Reilly. But the
show didn't last long. In fact, it didn't even last a year, even though
it was MSNBC"s top-rated program. When Donahue was fired, the network
moved to hire a string of right-wing hosts.

Phil Donahue joins us today in our studio.

* Phil Donahue, one of the best-known talk show hosts in the
history of television in the United States. His show was on the air for
more than 29 years. In 2003, he was fired by MSNBC because he was
allowing antiwar voices on the air.

RUSH (partial) TRANSCRIPT

AMY GOODMAN: This was in the lead-up to the invasion of Iraq on the
Donahue show.

PHIL DONAHUE: Welcome to Donahue. I am joined tonight by one of
the greatest entertainers of all time. He's also famous for his
political activism. He was a radical long before it was chic. Recently,
Harry Belafonte has been embroiled in a controversy about comments he
made about Secretary of State Colin Powell.

AMY GOODMAN: Then Phil Donahue played an interview with Harry Belafonte
that had just aired on a San Diego radio station, KFMB, in California

HARRY BELAFONTE: There is an old saying in the days of slavery,
there were those slaves who lived on the plantation, and there were
those slaves who live lived in the house. You got the privilege of
living in the house if you served the master to exactly the way the
master intended to have you serve him. That gave you privilege. Colin
Powell's permitted to come into the house of the master, as long as he
would serve the master according to the master's dictates. And when
Colin Powell dares to suggest something other than what the master
wants to hear, he will be turned back out to pasture.

AMY GOODMAN: That was Harry Belafonte on KFMB radio in San Diego being
rebroadcast on Donahue's show on MSNBC. Phil Donahue was on in the same
time slot as Fox's Bill O'Reilly, but the show didn't last -- Phil's,
that is. In fact, it didn't even last a year, even though it was
MSNBC's top rated program. When Donahue was fired, the network moved to
hire a string of right wing hosts. Phil Donahue joins us in the studio
right now. It's great to have you with us.

PHIL DONAHUE: Hi, Amy. Nice to be here.

AMY GOODMAN: Well, we all learned about this memo, just soon after you
were fired that came out of NBC, that was -- that said that as we led
into the invasion of Iraq, they didn't want to have their flagship
show, no matter how successful it was, the most popular show on MSNBC,
being one that provided a forum for anti-war voices. They didn't want
an anti-war face when the other networks were waving the American flag.

PHIL DONAHUE: Right.

AMY GOODMAN: Your response?

PHIL DONAHUE: Well, that memo was a fact, and it was reported by The
New York Times and other publications. Our program was doing reasonably
well. We weren't Elvis, but the program for its -- the numbers of our
program on the family of NBC -- MSNBC at night, was very respectable,
and I think had a prospect of growing even larger. So, the numbers did
not warrant our departure, our dismissal. And along the way it became
clear to us that they were terrified that we were going to become a
place -- an anti-war kind of platform, where all of these radicals
would come and oppose the war.

AMY GOODMAN: Like Harry Belafonte.

PHIL DONAHUE: Yes, and others. We had some wonderful - for a peaceful
tomorrow. I mean, I came back to television and ran right into a wall
of widows. I mean, that shocked me. I just somehow wasn't anticipating
this. 9/11 widows. The New Jersey girls and these wonderful people,
people who came on -- mothers, wives said, "Not in my name. Don't
kill more innocent people to avenge the death of my loved one." We
just were very excited about what we were doing. Along the way, it
became clear that they were really very nervous about us, and the rule
was laid down, we had to have two conservatives for every liberal. I
was counted as two liberals. I mean, this is the truth. So I was very,
very naive, you know, for a veteran guy, I can't get over - and
there's probably some vanity involved here, too. I thought I was
going to be a place where dissent could be heard. I really believed
that that was going to happen. And it was very naive of me to think
that. It made them very, very nervous.

JUAN GONZALEZ: On the same -- in the same vein, though, they knew your
viewpoints and perspectives from the past.

PHIL DONAHUE: I can't figure that, either. Yes

JUAN GONZALEZ: They knew that you are more open to having dissenting
voices on, so what were they expecting, when they agree to -- that you
had mellowed?

PHIL DONAHUE: I think that they felt that -- 29 years on the air, I
mean, pretty high name recognition for good old Phil, and they figured,
'well, numbers,' you know? And they forgot perhaps that I meet be
capable of featuring dissent. That's the only answer I can give. It
bewildered me, as well.

AMY GOODMAN: Let's go back in time to Donahue, to this show you started
when, in Dayton?

PHIL DONAHUE: November of 1967. When I said 1955, I want to say that
was at the University of Notre Dame. I happened to do the picks in the
morning. You know, sows and gilts and barrows. I didn't know what I was
talking about, but I was on the air, and it was 1955. I was 19 years
old.

AMY GOODMAN: And Donahue, the Dayton show? How --

PHIL DONAHUE: 1967. November. A local show.

AMY GOODMAN: How you changed really, day time talk. What did you do?
What was different about it?

PHIL DONAHUE: Well, we knew we were visually boring. We -- and
television was filled -- Monty Hall was on the other channel giving
away $5,000 to a woman dressed like a chicken salad sandwich, and Bob
Barker was saying, "Come on down!" And people were screaming and
yelling, and here comes Donahue with one talking head and a group of
women sitting on folding chairs. We had two cameras. It was live. And
it soon became -- we knew that we had to -- and we were in Dayton, so
-- you know, celebrities were not on call for us. I had been listening
to WBZ in Boston, a chap by the name of Bob Kennedy, no relation to the
political family. I remember him so very well. He's no longer with us,
but he was fabulous. It was a Westinghouse station, and I could hear it
in Dayton. And he was putting on people long distance on the, you know,
on the phone. And so I started doing that on radio in 1965, maybe. And
so, that's what translated to the TV show, and my first guest was
Madelaine Mary O'Hare who came on the program.

AMY GOODMAN: The atheist.

PHIL DONAHUE: Atheist who effected the Supreme Court decision banning
the official reading of prayer in school. 'There's no God, there's no
heaven, there's no hell. When you die, you go into the ground. The
worms eat you, you biodegrade, and you become part of the physical
universe.' Well, the building fell down. All of Dayton came to a
halt. It really was quite a sensation, as I knew it would be. And I
knew it better be, or we wouldn't -- we were very nervous about how
long we would last, as I say, because we were visually boring, so we
had to survive on issues. And she brought issues. 'I don't care if
you worship a pet rock, you pay for it. I'm tired of paying more taxes
because of your churches getting phony tax relief that causes my taxes
to -' oh, I mean, she was fabulous. And also, you know, a very, in
many ways, a very, very unpleasant woman whom I happened to really
like. I liked her a lot and still do and have fond memories of her, and
sorry about her grim death.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Over the years, obviously, you have been now witness to
the evolution of television and its power over the American population.
What do you -- what do you say, in looking at it, are some of the main
concerns that you have about how the medium has evolved?

PHIL DONAHUE: Well, you know, free speech to me means that -- I didn't
have -- I did not -- I was a newsman in Adrian, Michigan. I didn't have
to take a test. I didn't have to pee in a bottle. I didn't have to
appear before a board. I just became a journalist. I covered City Hall.
Anybody can be a journalist, even me. Very good idea, because it means
that you'll have a lot of people being journalists or getting news.
If you have a lot of people getting news -- sorry about this 101
lecture -- somewhere in the collective middle will be found the truth.
Today, that collective middle is occupied not by a whole lot of people,
but by fewer and fewer corporations, larger and larger in size, much
more concerned about the bottom line than they are about sticking their
nose under the tent.

AMY GOODMAN: Phil, you have been talking about media corporations for
quite a long time. I want to go back to 1995 to the Donahue show, when
you had among your guests, Jim Hightower. Let's take a listen.

PHIL DONAHUE: Here's what he said about Michael Eisner, Chairman
of the Board of Disney, before Disney buys the radio network he's on.
Go get 'em, Jim Hightower. Here you go on the radio.

JIM HIGHTOWER: Did you make $78,000 last year? Probably not. Less
than 5% of Americans make that much. But Michael Eisner, top dog at the
Disney Entertainment conglomerate made $78,000, not for the year, not
for a month or even a day. Last year, he pocketed $78,000 an hour, $203
million for one year. Plus, benefits and free passes to Disneyworld.

PHIL DONAHUE: [singing]When you wish upon - alright, Jim, not
so funny, McGee. You lost your job.

AMY GOODMAN: Phil Donahue with Jim Hightower. We're going to go to
break and come back. When Phil played another of Jim Hightower's
commentaries, it had to do with his boss being a rodent, but anyway,
we'll be back with Phil Donahue in a minute.

[break]

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=05/03/24/1446244

128K video:
http://play.rbn.com/?url=demnow/demnow/demand/2005/march/video/dnB20050324a.rm&proto=rtsp&start=28:49

audio:
http://play.rbn.com/?url=demnow/demnow/demand/2005/march/audio/dn20050324.ra&proto=rtsp&start=28:49


= = = =
STILL FEELING LIKE THE MAINSTREAM U.S. CORPORATE MEDIA
IS GIVING A FULL HONEST PICTURE OF WHAT'S GOING ON?
= = = =
Daily online radio show, news reporting: www.DemocracyNow.org
More news: UseNet's misc.activism.progressive (moderated)
= = = =
Sorry, we cannot read/reply to most usenet posts but welcome email
FOR MORE INFORMATION: http://EconomicDemocracy.org/wtc/ (peace)
http://economicdemocracy.org/eco/climate-summary.html (Climate)
And http://EconomicDemocracy.org/ (general)


** ANTI-SPAM EMAIL NOTE: For email "info" and "map" don't work. Email
to
** m-a-i-l-m-a-i-l (without the dashes) at economicdemocracy.org instead


BananaRepublican
2005-03-25 10:12:21 EST
In article <1111689353.437226.246970@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
i*o@economicdemocracy.org wrote:

> "AMY GOODMAN: Well, we all learned about this memo, just soon after you
> were fired that came out of NBC, that was -- that said that as we led
> into the invasion of Iraq, they didn't want to have their flagship
> show, no matter how successful it was, the most popular show on MSNBC,
> being one that provided a forum for anti-war voices. They didn't want
> [inclusion of] anti-war [voice] when the other networks were waving
> the [pro-war] flag"
>
> = = = =
>
> Thursday, March 24th, 2005
> Phil Donahue: "We Have an Emergency in the Media and We Have to Fix It"
>
> Listen to Segment || Download Show mp3
> Watch 128k stream Watch 256k stream Read Transcript
>
> Phil Donahue - one of the best-known talk show hosts in the history of
> television in the United States - joins us in our firehouse studio to
> discuss the state of the media in this country. Donahue's show was on
> the air for more than 29 years. In 2003, he was fired by MSNBC because
> he was allowing antiwar voices on the air. [includes rush transcript -
> partial]
>
> = = =
>
> Before Jerry Springer created a show that looked more like a wrestling
> match than a talk show; before Oprah was a household name and before
> the explosion of cable news networks and the 24 hour talk show cycle,
> there was a daily program that millions tuned into every week for a
> national discussion on a wide range of social, political and personal
> issues. The show was simply called "Donahue" and was hosted by a
> bespectacled man with silver hair who would run around the studio
> handing the microphone to members of the audience to give them their
> say on the issues of the day. For many people watching or listening
> right now, it is probably unnecessary to say that that man was Phil
> Donahue. Throughout the 1980s, he was probably one of the most trusted
> personalities in this country.
>
> Donahue first took to the airwaves in 1965. He hosted his radio program
> "Conversation Piece" in Dayton, Ohio. Two years later on November 6,
> The Donahue Show premiered on television with atheist Madalyn Murray
> O'Hair as its first guest. During the 1992 Presidential campaign,
> Donahue was credited with expanding the role of daytime television by
> featuring an unprecedented debate between then-candidates Bill Clinton
> and Jerry Brown. "The Donahue Show" was on the air for 29 years. In
> that time, Phil Donahue hosted more than 6,000 shows.
>
> After years of being away from hosting that daily, national discussion,
> Donahue returned to TV in 2002 as the host of a nightly debate-style
> program on MSNBC. For many people, the show was a much-needed breath of
> fresh air on the cable networks, increasingly dominated by right-wing
> pundits and media personalities. Antiwar voices long kept off these
> cable news channels were suddenly given a seat in the forbidden studios
> to take part in a national debate about the so-called war on terror.
>
> Here's an example - this was in the lead-up to the invasion of Iraq.
>
> * Phil Donahue on MSNBC interviewing Harry Belafonte.
>
> Donahue was on in the same time slot as Fox's Bill O"Reilly. But the
> show didn't last long. In fact, it didn't even last a year, even though
> it was MSNBC"s top-rated program. When Donahue was fired, the network
> moved to hire a string of right-wing hosts.
>
> Phil Donahue joins us today in our studio.
>
> * Phil Donahue, one of the best-known talk show hosts in the
> history of television in the United States. His show was on the air for
> more than 29 years. In 2003, he was fired by MSNBC because he was
> allowing antiwar voices on the air.
>
> RUSH (partial) TRANSCRIPT
>
> AMY GOODMAN: This was in the lead-up to the invasion of Iraq on the
> Donahue show.
>
> PHIL DONAHUE: Welcome to Donahue. I am joined tonight by one of
> the greatest entertainers of all time. He's also famous for his
> political activism. He was a radical long before it was chic. Recently,
> Harry Belafonte has been embroiled in a controversy about comments he
> made about Secretary of State Colin Powell.
>
> AMY GOODMAN: Then Phil Donahue played an interview with Harry Belafonte
> that had just aired on a San Diego radio station, KFMB, in California
>
> HARRY BELAFONTE: There is an old saying in the days of slavery,
> there were those slaves who lived on the plantation, and there were
> those slaves who live lived in the house. You got the privilege of
> living in the house if you served the master to exactly the way the
> master intended to have you serve him. That gave you privilege. Colin
> Powell's permitted to come into the house of the master, as long as he
> would serve the master according to the master's dictates. And when
> Colin Powell dares to suggest something other than what the master
> wants to hear, he will be turned back out to pasture.
>
> AMY GOODMAN: That was Harry Belafonte on KFMB radio in San Diego being
> rebroadcast on Donahue's show on MSNBC. Phil Donahue was on in the same
> time slot as Fox's Bill O'Reilly, but the show didn't last -- Phil's,
> that is. In fact, it didn't even last a year, even though it was
> MSNBC's top rated program. When Donahue was fired, the network moved to
> hire a string of right wing hosts. Phil Donahue joins us in the studio
> right now. It's great to have you with us.
>
> PHIL DONAHUE: Hi, Amy. Nice to be here.
>
> AMY GOODMAN: Well, we all learned about this memo, just soon after you
> were fired that came out of NBC, that was -- that said that as we led
> into the invasion of Iraq, they didn't want to have their flagship
> show, no matter how successful it was, the most popular show on MSNBC,
> being one that provided a forum for anti-war voices. They didn't want
> an anti-war face when the other networks were waving the American flag.
>
> PHIL DONAHUE: Right.
>
> AMY GOODMAN: Your response?
>
> PHIL DONAHUE: Well, that memo was a fact, and it was reported by The
> New York Times and other publications. Our program was doing reasonably
> well. We weren't Elvis, but the program for its -- the numbers of our
> program on the family of NBC -- MSNBC at night, was very respectable,
> and I think had a prospect of growing even larger. So, the numbers did
> not warrant our departure, our dismissal. And along the way it became
> clear to us that they were terrified that we were going to become a
> place -- an anti-war kind of platform, where all of these radicals
> would come and oppose the war.
>
> AMY GOODMAN: Like Harry Belafonte.
>
> PHIL DONAHUE: Yes, and others. We had some wonderful - for a peaceful
> tomorrow. I mean, I came back to television and ran right into a wall
> of widows. I mean, that shocked me. I just somehow wasn't anticipating
> this. 9/11 widows. The New Jersey girls and these wonderful people,
> people who came on -- mothers, wives said, "Not in my name. Don't
> kill more innocent people to avenge the death of my loved one." We
> just were very excited about what we were doing. Along the way, it
> became clear that they were really very nervous about us, and the rule
> was laid down, we had to have two conservatives for every liberal. I
> was counted as two liberals. I mean, this is the truth. So I was very,
> very naive, you know, for a veteran guy, I can't get over - and
> there's probably some vanity involved here, too. I thought I was
> going to be a place where dissent could be heard. I really believed
> that that was going to happen. And it was very naive of me to think
> that. It made them very, very nervous.
>
> JUAN GONZALEZ: On the same -- in the same vein, though, they knew your
> viewpoints and perspectives from the past.
>
> PHIL DONAHUE: I can't figure that, either. Yes
>
> JUAN GONZALEZ: They knew that you are more open to having dissenting
> voices on, so what were they expecting, when they agree to -- that you
> had mellowed?
>
> PHIL DONAHUE: I think that they felt that -- 29 years on the air, I
> mean, pretty high name recognition for good old Phil, and they figured,
> 'well, numbers,' you know? And they forgot perhaps that I meet be
> capable of featuring dissent. That's the only answer I can give. It
> bewildered me, as well.
>
> AMY GOODMAN: Let's go back in time to Donahue, to this show you started
> when, in Dayton?
>
> PHIL DONAHUE: November of 1967. When I said 1955, I want to say that
> was at the University of Notre Dame. I happened to do the picks in the
> morning. You know, sows and gilts and barrows. I didn't know what I was
> talking about, but I was on the air, and it was 1955. I was 19 years
> old.
>
> AMY GOODMAN: And Donahue, the Dayton show? How --
>
> PHIL DONAHUE: 1967. November. A local show.
>
> AMY GOODMAN: How you changed really, day time talk. What did you do?
> What was different about it?
>
> PHIL DONAHUE: Well, we knew we were visually boring. We -- and
> television was filled -- Monty Hall was on the other channel giving
> away $5,000 to a woman dressed like a chicken salad sandwich, and Bob
> Barker was saying, "Come on down!" And people were screaming and
> yelling, and here comes Donahue with one talking head and a group of
> women sitting on folding chairs. We had two cameras. It was live. And
> it soon became -- we knew that we had to -- and we were in Dayton, so
> -- you know, celebrities were not on call for us. I had been listening
> to WBZ in Boston, a chap by the name of Bob Kennedy, no relation to the
> political family. I remember him so very well. He's no longer with us,
> but he was fabulous. It was a Westinghouse station, and I could hear it
> in Dayton. And he was putting on people long distance on the, you know,
> on the phone. And so I started doing that on radio in 1965, maybe. And
> so, that's what translated to the TV show, and my first guest was
> Madelaine Mary O'Hare who came on the program.
>
> AMY GOODMAN: The atheist.
>
> PHIL DONAHUE: Atheist who effected the Supreme Court decision banning
> the official reading of prayer in school. 'There's no God, there's no
> heaven, there's no hell. When you die, you go into the ground. The
> worms eat you, you biodegrade, and you become part of the physical
> universe.' Well, the building fell down. All of Dayton came to a
> halt. It really was quite a sensation, as I knew it would be. And I
> knew it better be, or we wouldn't -- we were very nervous about how
> long we would last, as I say, because we were visually boring, so we
> had to survive on issues. And she brought issues. 'I don't care if
> you worship a pet rock, you pay for it. I'm tired of paying more taxes
> because of your churches getting phony tax relief that causes my taxes
> to -' oh, I mean, she was fabulous. And also, you know, a very, in
> many ways, a very, very unpleasant woman whom I happened to really
> like. I liked her a lot and still do and have fond memories of her, and
> sorry about her grim death.
>
> JUAN GONZALEZ: Over the years, obviously, you have been now witness to
> the evolution of television and its power over the American population.
> What do you -- what do you say, in looking at it, are some of the main
> concerns that you have about how the medium has evolved?
>
> PHIL DONAHUE: Well, you know, free speech to me means that -- I didn't
> have -- I did not -- I was a newsman in Adrian, Michigan. I didn't have
> to take a test. I didn't have to pee in a bottle. I didn't have to
> appear before a board. I just became a journalist. I covered City Hall.
> Anybody can be a journalist, even me. Very good idea, because it means
> that you'll have a lot of people being journalists or getting news.
> If you have a lot of people getting news -- sorry about this 101
> lecture -- somewhere in the collective middle will be found the truth.
> Today, that collective middle is occupied not by a whole lot of people,
> but by fewer and fewer corporations, larger and larger in size, much
> more concerned about the bottom line than they are about sticking their
> nose under the tent.
>
> AMY GOODMAN: Phil, you have been talking about media corporations for
> quite a long time. I want to go back to 1995 to the Donahue show, when
> you had among your guests, Jim Hightower. Let's take a listen.
>
> PHIL DONAHUE: Here's what he said about Michael Eisner, Chairman
> of the Board of Disney, before Disney buys the radio network he's on.
> Go get 'em, Jim Hightower. Here you go on the radio.
>
> JIM HIGHTOWER: Did you make $78,000 last year? Probably not. Less
> than 5% of Americans make that much. But Michael Eisner, top dog at the
> Disney Entertainment conglomerate made $78,000, not for the year, not
> for a month or even a day. Last year, he pocketed $78,000 an hour, $203
> million for one year. Plus, benefits and free passes to Disneyworld.
>
> PHIL DONAHUE: [singing]When you wish upon - alright, Jim, not
> so funny, McGee. You lost your job.
>
> AMY GOODMAN: Phil Donahue with Jim Hightower. We're going to go to
> break and come back. When Phil played another of Jim Hightower's
> commentaries, it had to do with his boss being a rodent, but anyway,
> we'll be back with Phil Donahue in a minute.
>
> [break]
>
> http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=05/03/24/1446244
>
> 128K video:
> http://play.rbn.com/?url=demnow/demnow/demand/2005/march/video/dnB20050324a.rm
> &proto=rtsp&start=28:49
>
> audio:
> http://play.rbn.com/?url=demnow/demnow/demand/2005/march/audio/dn20050324.ra&p
> roto=rtsp&start=28:49
>
>
> = = = =
> STILL FEELING LIKE THE MAINSTREAM U.S. CORPORATE MEDIA
> IS GIVING A FULL HONEST PICTURE OF WHAT'S GOING ON?
> = = = =
> Daily online radio show, news reporting: www.DemocracyNow.org
> More news: UseNet's misc.activism.progressive (moderated)
> = = = =
> Sorry, we cannot read/reply to most usenet posts but welcome email
> FOR MORE INFORMATION: http://EconomicDemocracy.org/wtc/ (peace)
> http://economicdemocracy.org/eco/climate-summary.html (Climate)
> And http://EconomicDemocracy.org/ (general)
>
>
> ** ANTI-SPAM EMAIL NOTE: For email "info" and "map" don't work. Email
> to
> ** m-a-i-l-m-a-i-l (without the dashes) at economicdemocracy.org instead
>

Democracy Now rules !
>
g adds.
MONEY , what a concept



DustyMars
2005-03-25 17:16:24 EST
In article <georgew.k-7137A0.07122025032005@corp.supernews.com>,
g*k@humboldt1.com says...
> Phil Donahue
>
Just love it when Phil Donahue talks dirty. He could be used as a model
for a shrink class.
--
RustyMars

"Nothing is rich but the inexhaustible wealth of nature. She shows us
only surfaces, but she is a million fathoms deep."
....Ralph Waldo Emerson

Wm James
2005-03-26 07:34:04 EST
On 24 Mar 2005 10:35:53 -0800, info@economicdemocracy.org wrote:

>Phil Donahue: "We Have an Emergency in the Media and We Have to Fix It"

ROTFLMAO! From his perspective, no doubt! He's a loser has-been who
can't attract enough people to form an audience.

William R. James


Dan Clore
2005-03-26 21:36:57 EST
Wm James wrote:
> On 24 Mar 2005 10:35:53 -0800, info@economicdemocracy.org wrote:

>>Phil Donahue: "We Have an Emergency in the Media and We Have to Fix It"
>
> ROTFLMAO! From his perspective, no doubt! He's a loser has-been who
> can't attract enough people to form an audience.

He did have the highest rated show on MSNBC, even in spite
of ridiculous constraints on his choice of guests.

--
Dan Clore

My collected fiction, _The Unspeakable and Others_:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1587154838/thedanclorenecro/
Lord We├┐rdgliffe & Necronomicon Page:
http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/9879/
News & Views for Anarchists & Activists:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smygo

Strange pleasures are known to him who flaunts the
immarcescible purple of poetry before the color-blind.
-- Clark Ashton Smith, "Epigrams and Apothegms"


DustyMars
2005-03-27 05:36:48 EST
In article <3amki5F64v5unU2@individual.net>, clore@columbia-center.org
says...
> Wm James wrote:
> > On 24 Mar 2005 10:35:53 -0800, info@economicdemocracy.org wrote:
>
> >>Phil Donahue: "We Have an Emergency in the Media and We Have to Fix It"
> >
> > ROTFLMAO! From his perspective, no doubt! He's a loser has-been who
> > can't attract enough people to form an audience.
>
> He did have the highest rated show on MSNBC, even in spite
> of ridiculous constraints on his choice of guests.
>
>
Having the highest rating on the lowest rated TV show ain't saying much.
--
RustyMars

"Nothing is rich but the inexhaustible wealth of nature. She shows us
only surfaces, but she is a million fathoms deep."
....Ralph Waldo Emerson

Wm James
2005-03-29 16:46:05 EST
On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 18:36:57 -0800, Dan Clore
<*e@columbia-center.org> wrote:

>Wm James wrote:
>> On 24 Mar 2005 10:35:53 -0800, info@economicdemocracy.org wrote:
>
>>>Phil Donahue: "We Have an Emergency in the Media and We Have to Fix It"
>>
>> ROTFLMAO! From his perspective, no doubt! He's a loser has-been who
>> can't attract enough people to form an audience.
>
>He did have the highest rated show on MSNBC, even in spite
>of ridiculous constraints on his choice of guests.

That's like being the tallest person in a pigmy tribe.

William R. James

Page: 1   (First | Last)


2021 - UsenetArchives.com | Contact Us | Privacy | Stats | Site Search
Become our Patron