Activism Discussion: Wal-Mart To Apologize For Ad In Newspaper

Wal-Mart To Apologize For Ad In Newspaper
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MrPepper11
2005-05-14 02:15:52 EST
May 14, 2005
Wal-Mart To Apologize For Ad in Newspaper
By Amy Joyce
Washington Post Staff Writer

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said yesterday that it made a "terrible" mistake
in approving a recent newspaper advertisement that equated a proposed
Arizona zoning ordinance with Nazi book-burning.

The full-page advertisement included a 1933 photo of people throwing
books on a pyre at Berlin's Opernplatz. It was run as part of a
campaign against a Flagstaff ballot proposal that would restrict
Wal-Mart from expanding a local store to include a grocery.

The accompanying text read "Should we let government tell us what we
can read? Of course not . . . So why should we allow local government
to limit where we shop?" The bottom of the advertisement announced that
the ad was "Paid for by Protect Flagstaff's Future-Major Funding by
Wal-Mart (Bentonville, AR)."

The ad, which ran May 8 in the Arizona Daily Sun, was "reviewed and
approved by Wal-Mart, but we did not know what the photo was from. We
obviously should have asked more questions," said Daphne Moore,
Wal-Mart's director of community affairs. She said the company will
also issue a letter of apology to the Arizona Anti-Defamation League.

The ADL, members of Congress and the United Food and Commercial Workers
International Union criticized the company for the advertisement.

"It's not the imagery itself. It trivializes the Nazis and what they
did. And to try to attach that imagery to a municipal election goes
beyond distasteful," said Bill Straus, Arizona regional director for
the ADL.

Wal-Mart, the nation's largest retailer, has given about $300,000 to
Protect Flagstaff's Future to help defeat Proposition 100, a local
ordinance that would restrict stores of more than 75,000 square feet
that devote more than 8 percent of their floor area to groceries. The
proposal is one of a number around the country to regulate the size and
design of big-box stores, particularly Wal-Marts. The vote on
Proposition 100 is scheduled for Tuesday.

After a decade of near silence in the face of criticism and lawsuits,
Wal-Mart is mounting a public relations counteroffensive to regain
control of its image. In keeping with the public relations push,
Wal-Mart will run a full-page apology in this weekend's Arizona Daily
Sun to respond to the negative reaction to the book-burning ad.

Though the ad includes no apparent Nazi insignia or imagery, Straus
said it's a well-known image among people "with any kind of knowledge
of the Holocaust." It was bought to his attention by a Flagstaff
college professor who Straus said was "extremely upset" at its use in a
campaign about shopping.

Straus contacted Wal-Mart on Friday, and Moore told him an apology
would be issued.

The advertisement also spurred action by Wake Up Wal-Mart, a campaign
funded by the UFCW. The group contacted the Anti-Defamation League on
Thursday, and wrote a letter to Wal-Mart chief executive H. Lee Scott
Jr. urging the company to "immediately end the company's support for
this group and its media campaign. You must publicly condemn this group
and you should offer a public apology on behalf of Wal-Mart making
clear you would never support -- directly or indirectly -- a media
campaign that uses Nazi imagery." Wake Up Wal-Mart also contacted
members of Congress.

The group that created the advertisement said the ad was one of a
series opposing Proposition 100. Other ads included a picture of a
child praying and a person with duct tape over her mouth. "We wanted
people to think about the freedoms we enjoy in America. The intent was
wholly honorable and good," said Chuck Coughlin, president of
Highground Inc., a Phoenix consulting company that created the
advertisement. "We will not back away from substance of the ads . . .
We will apologize for the use of imagery."

"People make mistakes. They move on," he said.


Rich
2005-05-14 07:01:24 EST
Actually the WalMartization of America is more like the Nazis takeover of
Europe, and these little towns that fight Wal-Mart are like Brittan, and
Russia.
"MrPepper11" <MrPepper11@go.com> wrote in message
news:1116051352.387419.161220@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> May 14, 2005
> Wal-Mart To Apologize For Ad in Newspaper
> By Amy Joyce
> Washington Post Staff Writer
>
> Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said yesterday that it made a "terrible" mistake
> in approving a recent newspaper advertisement that equated a proposed
> Arizona zoning ordinance with Nazi book-burning.
>
> The full-page advertisement included a 1933 photo of people throwing
> books on a pyre at Berlin's Opernplatz. It was run as part of a
> campaign against a Flagstaff ballot proposal that would restrict
> Wal-Mart from expanding a local store to include a grocery.
>
> The accompanying text read "Should we let government tell us what we
> can read? Of course not . . . So why should we allow local government
> to limit where we shop?" The bottom of the advertisement announced that
> the ad was "Paid for by Protect Flagstaff's Future-Major Funding by
> Wal-Mart (Bentonville, AR)."
>
> The ad, which ran May 8 in the Arizona Daily Sun, was "reviewed and
> approved by Wal-Mart, but we did not know what the photo was from. We
> obviously should have asked more questions," said Daphne Moore,
> Wal-Mart's director of community affairs. She said the company will
> also issue a letter of apology to the Arizona Anti-Defamation League.
>
> The ADL, members of Congress and the United Food and Commercial Workers
> International Union criticized the company for the advertisement.
>
> "It's not the imagery itself. It trivializes the Nazis and what they
> did. And to try to attach that imagery to a municipal election goes
> beyond distasteful," said Bill Straus, Arizona regional director for
> the ADL.
>
> Wal-Mart, the nation's largest retailer, has given about $300,000 to
> Protect Flagstaff's Future to help defeat Proposition 100, a local
> ordinance that would restrict stores of more than 75,000 square feet
> that devote more than 8 percent of their floor area to groceries. The
> proposal is one of a number around the country to regulate the size and
> design of big-box stores, particularly Wal-Marts. The vote on
> Proposition 100 is scheduled for Tuesday.
>
> After a decade of near silence in the face of criticism and lawsuits,
> Wal-Mart is mounting a public relations counteroffensive to regain
> control of its image. In keeping with the public relations push,
> Wal-Mart will run a full-page apology in this weekend's Arizona Daily
> Sun to respond to the negative reaction to the book-burning ad.
>
> Though the ad includes no apparent Nazi insignia or imagery, Straus
> said it's a well-known image among people "with any kind of knowledge
> of the Holocaust." It was bought to his attention by a Flagstaff
> college professor who Straus said was "extremely upset" at its use in a
> campaign about shopping.
>
> Straus contacted Wal-Mart on Friday, and Moore told him an apology
> would be issued.
>
> The advertisement also spurred action by Wake Up Wal-Mart, a campaign
> funded by the UFCW. The group contacted the Anti-Defamation League on
> Thursday, and wrote a letter to Wal-Mart chief executive H. Lee Scott
> Jr. urging the company to "immediately end the company's support for
> this group and its media campaign. You must publicly condemn this group
> and you should offer a public apology on behalf of Wal-Mart making
> clear you would never support -- directly or indirectly -- a media
> campaign that uses Nazi imagery." Wake Up Wal-Mart also contacted
> members of Congress.
>
> The group that created the advertisement said the ad was one of a
> series opposing Proposition 100. Other ads included a picture of a
> child praying and a person with duct tape over her mouth. "We wanted
> people to think about the freedoms we enjoy in America. The intent was
> wholly honorable and good," said Chuck Coughlin, president of
> Highground Inc., a Phoenix consulting company that created the
> advertisement. "We will not back away from substance of the ads . . .
> We will apologize for the use of imagery."
>
> "People make mistakes. They move on," he said.
>



Williams
2005-05-14 09:07:36 EST
but... but... they're patriotic and christian!!!
they used to brag about "made in the usa"... not they're more
responsible than any other company for selling american jobs to
china...
walmart is nothing but a shitty storefront for china and a dehumanizing
slave camp


Ryan
2005-05-14 09:26:04 EST


Good grief. I certainly wouldn't want to be a Wal-Mart employee these
days.

1. Profits are falling as they recently reported.
2. Bad PR for Wal-Mart seems to come daily.
3. Consumer are starting to think of "Wal-Mart" and "evil" in the same
terms. That is bad news for any company.
4. Service at their stores remains poor, causing people to shop
elsewhere, like Target.

If I were Wal-Mart, I would stop opening new stores, raise salaries and
clean up the company's image NOW before any more damage is done.


Mike Craney
2005-05-14 09:35:36 EST

"Ryan" <welziak@snet.net> wrote in message
news:1116077164.628453.291210@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
>
> Good grief. I certainly wouldn't want to be a Wal-Mart employee these
> days.
>
> 1. Profits are falling as they recently reported.
> 2. Bad PR for Wal-Mart seems to come daily.
> 3. Consumer are starting to think of "Wal-Mart" and "evil" in the same
> terms. That is bad news for any company.
> 4. Service at their stores remains poor, causing people to shop
> elsewhere, like Target.
>
> If I were Wal-Mart, I would stop opening new stores, raise salaries and
> clean up the company's image NOW before any more damage is done.

Which is why you're not running Wal-Mart. WM has a repeatable formula where
every time they drop a new store in they increase both revenues and profits.
You'd stop taking sure increases in revenue and profits because of an image
problem which is mostly beyond your control anyway? And concurrently you'd
decrease your profits further by raising salaries at the same time?

Geez.......

Mike




Scott_en_Aztl=E1n_=3Cscottenaztlan=40NOyahooSPAM=2Ecom=3E?=
2005-05-14 12:25:47 EST
On 13 May 2005 23:15:52 -0700, "MrPepper11" <MrPepper11@go.com> wrote:

>Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said yesterday that it made a "terrible" mistake
>in approving a recent newspaper advertisement that equated a proposed
>Arizona zoning ordinance with Nazi book-burning.
>
>The full-page advertisement included a 1933 photo of people throwing
>books on a pyre at Berlin's Opernplatz.
>
>The accompanying text read "Should we let government tell us what we
>can read? Of course not . . . So why should we allow local government
>to limit where we shop?"
>
>"It's not the imagery itself. It trivializes the Nazis and what they
>did. And to try to attach that imagery to a municipal election goes
>beyond distasteful," said Bill Straus, Arizona regional director for
>the ADL.

OK, so substitute a still from the movie "Fahrenheit 451" showing the
Firemen burning some books and the problem will be solved.

--
Proud to be a wreckless driver!
http://www.geocities.com/scottenaztlan/

Bat
2005-05-14 13:11:57 EST
M> Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said yesterday that it made a "terrible" mistake
M> in approving a recent newspaper advertisement that equated a proposed
M> Arizona zoning ordinance with Nazi book-burning.

...

M> said Daphne Moore, Wal-Mart's director of community affairs. She said
M> the company will also issue a letter of apology to the Arizona
M> Anti-Defamation League.

M> The ADL, members of Congress and the United Food and Commercial Workers
M> International Union criticized the company for the advertisement.

M> "It's not the imagery itself. It trivializes the Nazis and what they
M> did. And to try to attach that imagery to a municipal election goes
M> beyond distasteful," said Bill Straus, Arizona regional director for
M> the ADL.

I did not quite get, what Wal-Mart is going to apologize for? From the
description, it looks like Nazi were depicted as master evil, so what's the
terrible mistake - using Nazi theme without ADL's approval and for another
purpose?


Googled
2005-05-14 13:37:18 EST

"Ryan" <welziak@snet.net> wrote in message
news:1116077164.628453.291210@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
>
> Good grief. I certainly wouldn't want to be a Wal-Mart employee these
> days.
>
> 1. Profits are falling as they recently reported.
> 2. Bad PR for Wal-Mart seems to come daily.
> 3. Consumer are starting to think of "Wal-Mart" and "evil" in the same
> terms. That is bad news for any company.
> 4. Service at their stores remains poor, causing people to shop
> elsewhere, like Target.
>
> If I were Wal-Mart, I would stop opening new stores, raise salaries and
> clean up the company's image NOW before any more damage is done.
>

1. Completely False. On May 12, 2005 Wal-Mart reported record sales and
earnings for the first quarter. Sales were up 9.5% and net income up 13.6%.
They did not make their sales and profit goals.
2. True.
3. It is more a case of consumers equate Wal-Mart with boring.
4. Wal-Mart has always had poor/no service. Target has nicer stores and
better merchandise mix.




R*@comcast.net
2005-05-14 13:38:42 EST
On Sat, 14 May 2005 17:11:57 GMT, "bat" <bat@bats.com> wrote:

>
>I did not quite get, what Wal-Mart is going to apologize for? From the
>description, it looks like Nazi were depicted as master evil, so what's the
>terrible mistake - using Nazi theme without ADL's approval and for another
>purpose?


Trivializing the Nazis by comparing book burning to a zoning conflict?

-------------------------

"My definition of a free society is a society where it is safe to be unpopular."

Adlai E. Stevenson Jr.

Steve
2005-05-14 13:50:27 EST
"googled" <googled@blah.com> wrote:
>4. Wal-Mart has always had poor/no service. Target has nicer stores and
>better merchandise mix.

But not much better service. It's just as hard to find a Target
employee on the floor as it is to find a WalMart employee. And their
employees exhibit about the same range of competence and friendliness.

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