Activism Discussion: Demonize, Disguise, Divert: Pinning The Blame On Newsweek

Demonize, Disguise, Divert: Pinning The Blame On Newsweek
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MrPepper11
2005-05-17 13:45:01 EST
May 17, 2005
Demonize, Disguise, Divert
Pinning the Blame on Newsweek
By ROBERT JENSEN and PAT YOUNGBLOOD

If there is a political playbook for right-wing conservatives these
days, it no doubt begins, "Step #1: Whenever possible, blame the news
media."

What to do if the U.S. invasions/occupations of Afghanistan and Iraq
have sparked resistance in those countries because people generally
don't like being occupied by a foreign power that has interests in
exploiting their resources and/or geopolitical value? Blame
journalists.

That's exactly what the Bush administration and its rhetorical attack
dogs are doing with the "scandal" over Newsweek's story on the
desecration of the Quran at the U.S. prison at Guantanamo.

In a short item in its May 9 issue, Newsweek reported that U.S.
military investigators had found evidence that U.S. guards had flushed
a copy of the Quran down a toilet to try to provoke prisoners. This
week, the magazine retracted, saying not that editors knew for sure
that such an incident didn't happen but that, "Based on what we know
now, we are retracting our original story that an internal military
investigation had uncovered Quran abuse at Guantanamo Bay."

Meanwhile, after the original story ran, Afghan and U.S. forces fired
on demonstrators in Afghanistan, killing at least 14 and injuring many
others.

The conventional wisdom emerged quickly: Newsweek got it wrong, and
Newsweek is to blame for the deaths. The first conclusion is premature;
the second is wrong.

First, it's not clear whether U.S. guards in Guantanamo or other
prisons have placed copies of the Quran on a toilet or thrown pages (or
a whole Quran) into a toilet. Detainees have made such claims, which
have been reported by attorneys representing some of the men in custody
and denied by U.S. officials. Newsweek's retraction is ambiguous,
suggesting they believe the incident may have happened but no longer
can demonstrate that it was cited in the specific U.S. government
documents, as originally reported.

Given the abuse and torture -- from sexual humiliation to beatings to
criminal homicide -- that has gone on in various U.S. military prison
facilities, it's not hard to believe that the Quran stories could be
true. Given that last month U.S. officials pressured the United Nations
to eliminate the job of its top human-rights investigator in
Afghanistan after that official criticized violations by U.S. forces in
the country, it's not hard to be skeptical about U.S. motives. And
given that even the human-rights commission of the generally compliant
Afghan government is blocked by U.S. forces from visiting the prisons,
it's not hard to believe that the U.S. officials may have something to
hide.

Until we have more information, definitive conclusions are impossible.
But if you go on a popular right-wing web site, you'll find the verdict
that administration supporters are trying to make the final word:
"Newsweek lied, people died."

Yes, people died during demonstrations, and political leaders in the
Muslim world have cited the Quran stories to spark anti-U.S. feeling.
But reporters outside the United States have pointed out that these
demonstrations have not been spontaneous but were well-organized, often
by groups of students. The frustration with U.S. policy that fuels
these demonstrations isn't limited to the Quran incident, and to reduce
the unrest to one magazine story is misleading. Indeed, Gen. Richard
Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said at a news conference
last week that the senior commander in Afghanistan, Army Gen. Carl
Eichenberry, reported that the violence "was not at all tied to the
article in the magazine."

So, why the focus on the Newsweek story? It's part of the
tried-and-true strategy of demonize, disguise, and divert. Demonize the
news media to disguise the real causes of the resistance to occupation
and divert attention from failed U.S. policies.

The irony is that the U.S. corporate news media deserve harsh criticism
for coverage of the U.S. wars in Afghanistan and Iraq -- not for
possibly getting one fact wrong, but for failing to consistently
challenge the illegality of both wars and the various distortions and
lies that the Bush administration has used to mobilize support for
those illegal wars.

We should hold the news media accountable when they fail. But we should
defend journalists when they are used by political partisans who are
eager to obscure their own failures.

----------
http://www.counterpunch.org/jensen05172005.html


H*@nospam.com
2005-05-17 13:54:32 EST
On 17 May 2005 10:45:01 -0700, "MrPepper11" <MrPepper11@go.com> wrote:

>May 17, 2005
>Demonize, Disguise, Divert
>Pinning the Blame on Newsweek
>By ROBERT JENSEN and PAT YOUNGBLOOD
>
>If there is a political playbook for right-wing conservatives these
>days, it no doubt begins, "Step #1: Whenever possible, blame the news
>media."
>
>What to do if the U.S. invasions/occupations of Afghanistan and Iraq
>have sparked resistance in those countries because people generally
>don't like being occupied by a foreign power that has interests in
>exploiting their resources and/or geopolitical value? Blame
>journalists.

The 14 Defining
Characteristics Of Fascism
Free Inquiry
Spring 2003
5-11-3

Dr. Lawrence Britt has examined the fascist regimes of Hitler
(Germany), Mussolini (Italy), Franco (Spain), Suharto (Indonesia) and
several Latin American regimes. Britt found 14 defining
characteristics common to each:

3. Identification of Enemies/Scapegoats as a Unifying Cause - The
people are rallied into a unifying patriotic frenzy over the need to
eliminate a perceived common threat or foe: racial , ethnic or
religious minorities; liberals; communists; socialists, terrorists,
etc.


6. Controlled Mass Media - Sometimes to media is directly controlled
by the government, but in other cases, the media is indirectly
controlled by government regulation, or sympathetic media spokespeople
and executives. Censorship, especially in war time, is very common.


Hal


>
>That's exactly what the Bush administration and its rhetorical attack
>dogs are doing with the "scandal" over Newsweek's story on the
>desecration of the Quran at the U.S. prison at Guantanamo.
>
>In a short item in its May 9 issue, Newsweek reported that U.S.
>military investigators had found evidence that U.S. guards had flushed
>a copy of the Quran down a toilet to try to provoke prisoners. This
>week, the magazine retracted, saying not that editors knew for sure
>that such an incident didn't happen but that, "Based on what we know
>now, we are retracting our original story that an internal military
>investigation had uncovered Quran abuse at Guantanamo Bay."
>
>Meanwhile, after the original story ran, Afghan and U.S. forces fired
>on demonstrators in Afghanistan, killing at least 14 and injuring many
>others.
>
>The conventional wisdom emerged quickly: Newsweek got it wrong, and
>Newsweek is to blame for the deaths. The first conclusion is premature;
>the second is wrong.
>
>First, it's not clear whether U.S. guards in Guantanamo or other
>prisons have placed copies of the Quran on a toilet or thrown pages (or
>a whole Quran) into a toilet. Detainees have made such claims, which
>have been reported by attorneys representing some of the men in custody
>and denied by U.S. officials. Newsweek's retraction is ambiguous,
>suggesting they believe the incident may have happened but no longer
>can demonstrate that it was cited in the specific U.S. government
>documents, as originally reported.
>
>Given the abuse and torture -- from sexual humiliation to beatings to
>criminal homicide -- that has gone on in various U.S. military prison
>facilities, it's not hard to believe that the Quran stories could be
>true. Given that last month U.S. officials pressured the United Nations
>to eliminate the job of its top human-rights investigator in
>Afghanistan after that official criticized violations by U.S. forces in
>the country, it's not hard to be skeptical about U.S. motives. And
>given that even the human-rights commission of the generally compliant
>Afghan government is blocked by U.S. forces from visiting the prisons,
>it's not hard to believe that the U.S. officials may have something to
>hide.
>
>Until we have more information, definitive conclusions are impossible.
>But if you go on a popular right-wing web site, you'll find the verdict
>that administration supporters are trying to make the final word:
>"Newsweek lied, people died."
>
>Yes, people died during demonstrations, and political leaders in the
>Muslim world have cited the Quran stories to spark anti-U.S. feeling.
>But reporters outside the United States have pointed out that these
>demonstrations have not been spontaneous but were well-organized, often
>by groups of students. The frustration with U.S. policy that fuels
>these demonstrations isn't limited to the Quran incident, and to reduce
>the unrest to one magazine story is misleading. Indeed, Gen. Richard
>Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said at a news conference
>last week that the senior commander in Afghanistan, Army Gen. Carl
>Eichenberry, reported that the violence "was not at all tied to the
>article in the magazine."
>
>So, why the focus on the Newsweek story? It's part of the
>tried-and-true strategy of demonize, disguise, and divert. Demonize the
>news media to disguise the real causes of the resistance to occupation
>and divert attention from failed U.S. policies.
>
>The irony is that the U.S. corporate news media deserve harsh criticism
>for coverage of the U.S. wars in Afghanistan and Iraq -- not for
>possibly getting one fact wrong, but for failing to consistently
>challenge the illegality of both wars and the various distortions and
>lies that the Bush administration has used to mobilize support for
>those illegal wars.
>
>We should hold the news media accountable when they fail. But we should
>defend journalists when they are used by political partisans who are
>eager to obscure their own failures.
>
>----------
>http://www.counterpunch.org/jensen05172005.html


Stan De SD
2005-05-17 14:44:01 EST

"MrPepper11" <MrPepper11@go.com> wrote in message
news:1116351901.770389.309470@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> May 17, 2005
> Demonize, Disguise, Divert
> Pinning the Blame on Newsweek
> By ROBERT JENSEN and PAT YOUNGBLOOD
>
> If there is a political playbook for right-wing conservatives these
> days, it no doubt begins, "Step #1: Whenever possible, blame the news
> media."

So a news agency, blinded by its own political bias, feels compelled to run
a story that results in inflamed passions, violence and death,can't be
bothered to verify the volatile accusation the entire story is based around,
can't accept blame for it's own actions?




Geo
2005-05-17 15:02:11 EST

MrPepper11 wrote:
> May 17, 2005
> Demonize, Disguise, Divert
> Pinning the Blame on Newsweek
> By ROBERT JENSEN and PAT YOUNGBLOOD
>
> If there is a political playbook for right-wing conservatives these
> days, it no doubt begins, "Step #1: Whenever possible, blame the news
> media."
>
> What to do if the U.S. invasions/occupations of Afghanistan and Iraq
> have sparked resistance in those countries because people generally
> don't like being occupied by a foreign power that has interests in
> exploiting their resources and/or geopolitical value? Blame
> journalists.
>
> That's exactly what the Bush administration and its rhetorical attack
> dogs are doing with the "scandal" over Newsweek's story on the
> desecration of the Quran at the U.S. prison at Guantanamo.
>
> In a short item in its May 9 issue, Newsweek reported that U.S.
> military investigators had found evidence that U.S. guards had
flushed
> a copy of the Quran down a toilet to try to provoke prisoners. This
> week, the magazine retracted, saying not that editors knew for sure
> that such an incident didn't happen but that, "Based on what we know
> now, we are retracting our original story that an internal military
> investigation had uncovered Quran abuse at Guantanamo Bay."
>
> Meanwhile, after the original story ran, Afghan and U.S. forces fired
> on demonstrators in Afghanistan, killing at least 14 and injuring
many
> others.
>
> The conventional wisdom emerged quickly: Newsweek got it wrong, and
> Newsweek is to blame for the deaths. The first conclusion is
premature;
> the second is wrong.
>
> First, it's not clear whether U.S. guards in Guantanamo or other
> prisons have placed copies of the Quran on a toilet or thrown pages
(or
> a whole Quran) into a toilet. Detainees have made such claims, which
> have been reported by attorneys representing some of the men in
custody
> and denied by U.S. officials. Newsweek's retraction is ambiguous,
> suggesting they believe the incident may have happened but no longer
> can demonstrate that it was cited in the specific U.S. government
> documents, as originally reported.
>

This paragrapah in and of itself is hilarious. If it's not clear
whether the quran was thrown in the crapper then why make the
allegation at all? Seems to me, just like the Rather incident,
Newsweek wanted to get Bush on something so badly that they made relied
on questionable sources. Newsweek got caught stpping on thier own
collective dicks. Now, they are in damage control mode. Thier
credibility is shot. And people like Jensen and Youngblood see fit to
blame everyone except the one organization that fucked it up -
Newsweek.

> Given the abuse and torture -- from sexual humiliation to beatings to
> criminal homicide -- that has gone on in various U.S. military prison
> facilities, it's not hard to believe that the Quran stories could be
> true. Given that last month U.S. officials pressured the United
Nations
> to eliminate the job of its top human-rights investigator in
> Afghanistan after that official criticized violations by U.S. forces
in
> the country, it's not hard to be skeptical about U.S. motives. And
> given that even the human-rights commission of the generally
compliant
> Afghan government is blocked by U.S. forces from visiting the
prisons,
> it's not hard to believe that the U.S. officials may have something
to
> hide.
>
> Until we have more information, definitive conclusions are
impossible.
> But if you go on a popular right-wing web site, you'll find the
verdict
> that administration supporters are trying to make the final word:
> "Newsweek lied, people died."
>
> Yes, people died during demonstrations, and political leaders in the
> Muslim world have cited the Quran stories to spark anti-U.S. feeling.
> But reporters outside the United States have pointed out that these
> demonstrations have not been spontaneous but were well-organized,
often
> by groups of students. The frustration with U.S. policy that fuels
> these demonstrations isn't limited to the Quran incident, and to
reduce
> the unrest to one magazine story is misleading. Indeed, Gen. Richard
> Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said at a news
conference
> last week that the senior commander in Afghanistan, Army Gen. Carl
> Eichenberry, reported that the violence "was not at all tied to the
> article in the magazine."
>
> So, why the focus on the Newsweek story? It's part of the
> tried-and-true strategy of demonize, disguise, and divert. Demonize
the
> news media to disguise the real causes of the resistance to
occupation
> and divert attention from failed U.S. policies.
>
> The irony is that the U.S. corporate news media deserve harsh
criticism
> for coverage of the U.S. wars in Afghanistan and Iraq -- not for
> possibly getting one fact wrong, but for failing to consistently
> challenge the illegality of both wars and the various distortions and
> lies that the Bush administration has used to mobilize support for
> those illegal wars.
>
> We should hold the news media accountable when they fail. But we
should
> defend journalists when they are used by political partisans who are
> eager to obscure their own failures.
>
> ----------
> http://www.counterpunch.org/jensen05172005.html


H*@nospam.com
2005-05-17 15:19:09 EST
On 17 May 2005 12:02:11 -0700, "Geo" <taxpayer779@hotmail.com> wrote:


>> First, it's not clear whether U.S. guards in Guantanamo or other
>> prisons have placed copies of the Quran on a toilet or thrown pages
>(or
>> a whole Quran) into a toilet. Detainees have made such claims, which
>> have been reported by attorneys representing some of the men in
>custody
>> and denied by U.S. officials. Newsweek's retraction is ambiguous,
>> suggesting they believe the incident may have happened but no longer
>> can demonstrate that it was cited in the specific U.S. government
>> documents, as originally reported.
>>
>
>This paragrapah in and of itself is hilarious. If it's not clear
>whether the quran was thrown in the crapper then why make the
>allegation at all?

For one thing there are about 60 lawsuits presently pending that make
that very allegation.


> Seems to me, just like the Rather incident,

Secondly, the Rather "incident" was clearly true, Bush, was, in fact,
AWOL, so the real issue is not reporting the truth, it's about the US
government's increasing ability to stifle the press.

Hal

>Newsweek wanted to get Bush on something so badly that they made relied
>on questionable sources. Newsweek got caught stpping on thier own
>collective dicks. Now, they are in damage control mode. Thier
>credibility is shot. And people like Jensen and Youngblood see fit to
>blame everyone except the one organization that fucked it up -
>Newsweek.
>
>> Given the abuse and torture -- from sexual humiliation to beatings to
>> criminal homicide -- that has gone on in various U.S. military prison
>> facilities, it's not hard to believe that the Quran stories could be
>> true. Given that last month U.S. officials pressured the United
>Nations
>> to eliminate the job of its top human-rights investigator in
>> Afghanistan after that official criticized violations by U.S. forces
>in
>> the country, it's not hard to be skeptical about U.S. motives. And
>> given that even the human-rights commission of the generally
>compliant
>> Afghan government is blocked by U.S. forces from visiting the
>prisons,
>> it's not hard to believe that the U.S. officials may have something
>to
>> hide.
>>
>> Until we have more information, definitive conclusions are
>impossible.
>> But if you go on a popular right-wing web site, you'll find the
>verdict
>> that administration supporters are trying to make the final word:
>> "Newsweek lied, people died."
>>
>> Yes, people died during demonstrations, and political leaders in the
>> Muslim world have cited the Quran stories to spark anti-U.S. feeling.
>> But reporters outside the United States have pointed out that these
>> demonstrations have not been spontaneous but were well-organized,
>often
>> by groups of students. The frustration with U.S. policy that fuels
>> these demonstrations isn't limited to the Quran incident, and to
>reduce
>> the unrest to one magazine story is misleading. Indeed, Gen. Richard
>> Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said at a news
>conference
>> last week that the senior commander in Afghanistan, Army Gen. Carl
>> Eichenberry, reported that the violence "was not at all tied to the
>> article in the magazine."
>>
>> So, why the focus on the Newsweek story? It's part of the
>> tried-and-true strategy of demonize, disguise, and divert. Demonize
>the
>> news media to disguise the real causes of the resistance to
>occupation
>> and divert attention from failed U.S. policies.
>>
>> The irony is that the U.S. corporate news media deserve harsh
>criticism
>> for coverage of the U.S. wars in Afghanistan and Iraq -- not for
>> possibly getting one fact wrong, but for failing to consistently
>> challenge the illegality of both wars and the various distortions and
>> lies that the Bush administration has used to mobilize support for
>> those illegal wars.
>>
>> We should hold the news media accountable when they fail. But we
>should
>> defend journalists when they are used by political partisans who are
>> eager to obscure their own failures.
>>
>> ----------
>> http://www.counterpunch.org/jensen05172005.html


Ouroboros Rex
2005-05-17 15:23:44 EST

"Stan de SD" <standesd@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:RXqie.3245$Ri4.497@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
>
> "MrPepper11" <MrPepper11@go.com> wrote in message
> news:1116351901.770389.309470@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>> May 17, 2005
>> Demonize, Disguise, Divert
>> Pinning the Blame on Newsweek
>> By ROBERT JENSEN and PAT YOUNGBLOOD
>>
>> If there is a political playbook for right-wing conservatives these
>> days, it no doubt begins, "Step #1: Whenever possible, blame the news
>> media."
>
> So a news agency, blinded by its own political bias,

lie

feels compelled to run
> a story that results in inflamed passions, violence and death,

Blame the messenger. lol

can't be
> bothered to verify the volatile accusation the entire story is based
> around,

lie

> can't accept blame for it's own actions?

lol As per usual, Stanley resides safe in his warm fuzzy blanket of
delusion.

Hey Stanley, were you whining about possible bloodshed when the
Koran-in-the-toilet news first came out a year ago? lol



Ouroboros Rex
2005-05-17 15:29:37 EST

"Geo" <taxpayer779@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1116353319.637830.106840@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
> MrPepper11 wrote:
>> May 17, 2005
>> Demonize, Disguise, Divert
>> Pinning the Blame on Newsweek
>> By ROBERT JENSEN and PAT YOUNGBLOOD
>>
>> If there is a political playbook for right-wing conservatives these
>> days, it no doubt begins, "Step #1: Whenever possible, blame the news
>> media."
>>
>> What to do if the U.S. invasions/occupations of Afghanistan and Iraq
>> have sparked resistance in those countries because people generally
>> don't like being occupied by a foreign power that has interests in
>> exploiting their resources and/or geopolitical value? Blame
>> journalists.
>>
>> That's exactly what the Bush administration and its rhetorical attack
>> dogs are doing with the "scandal" over Newsweek's story on the
>> desecration of the Quran at the U.S. prison at Guantanamo.
>>
>> In a short item in its May 9 issue, Newsweek reported that U.S.
>> military investigators had found evidence that U.S. guards had
> flushed
>> a copy of the Quran down a toilet to try to provoke prisoners. This
>> week, the magazine retracted, saying not that editors knew for sure
>> that such an incident didn't happen but that, "Based on what we know
>> now, we are retracting our original story that an internal military
>> investigation had uncovered Quran abuse at Guantanamo Bay."
>>
>> Meanwhile, after the original story ran, Afghan and U.S. forces fired
>> on demonstrators in Afghanistan, killing at least 14 and injuring
> many
>> others.
>>
>> The conventional wisdom emerged quickly: Newsweek got it wrong, and
>> Newsweek is to blame for the deaths. The first conclusion is
> premature;
>> the second is wrong.
>>
>> First, it's not clear whether U.S. guards in Guantanamo or other
>> prisons have placed copies of the Quran on a toilet or thrown pages
> (or
>> a whole Quran) into a toilet. Detainees have made such claims, which
>> have been reported by attorneys representing some of the men in
> custody
>> and denied by U.S. officials. Newsweek's retraction is ambiguous,
>> suggesting they believe the incident may have happened but no longer
>> can demonstrate that it was cited in the specific U.S. government
>> documents, as originally reported.
>>
>
> This paragrapah in and of itself is hilarious. If it's not clear
> whether the quran was thrown in the crapper then why make the
> allegation at all?

That was done by the US investigators.

Seems to me, just like the Rather incident,
> Newsweek wanted to get Bush on something so badly that they made relied
> on questionable sources.

Nope - just sources vulnerable to threats from the Bush administration,
apparently.

> Newsweek got caught stpping on thier own
> collective dicks. Now, they are in damage control mode. Thier
> credibility is shot. And people like Jensen and Youngblood see fit to
> blame everyone except the one organization that fucked it up -
> Newsweek.

Poor Geo, his lies are getting so predictable. Unfortunately for him, The
Koran was thrown in the toilet by Americans. He seeks, like any Nazi would,
to draw attention away from this through the administration smokescreen.
lol

Detainees' lawsuits also allege desecration
By Toni Locy, USA TODAY

Current and former detainees have been alleging for more than a year
that American soldiers in Afghanistan, Iraq and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,
have desecrated the Koran.

The claims are made in some of the 65 lawsuits that have been filed in
U.S. District Court in Washington on behalf of nearly 180 detainees,
as well as in accounts given to human rights workers.

For instance, a lawsuit filed this year in Illinois by the American
Civil Liberties Union against Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld
recounts a claim by a detainee in Iraq who says soldiers allowed a
military dog to carry the Islamic holy book in the animal's mouth.

Another lawsuit filed in Washington in January on behalf of 12 Kuwaiti
detainees held at Guantanamo Bay alleges that American soldiers tore
up the Koran and threw pages into toilets as part of a humiliation
tactic....

The Center for Constitutional Rights, a New York-based civil liberties
group that represents several detainees in lawsuits, says that
interviews with detainees and government documents have revealed a
systemic use of religious abuse as an interrogation tactic to
humiliate prisoners.

In a statement Monday, the group says that the abuses include sexual
taunting, depriving detainees of long pants during prayer times,
deliberate interference with prayers, wrapping a prisoner in an
Israeli flag, desecration and mishandling of the Koran and,
most-recently, religious slurs directed toward prisoners'
attorneys....

U.S. troops' handling of the Koran is not a new issue. It was a key
cause of detainees' first hunger strike at Guantanamo in 2002, says
John Sifton, a researcher with Human Rights Watch in New York.

Detainees had alleged that a soldier had thrown the Koran on the
ground. Military commanders at Guantanamo Bay responded to the hunger
strike by making significant changes in conditions at the prison
regarding religious practices, Sifton said.

Some of the allegations, while never verified, get broad circulation.
For example, In December, a former detainee in Afghanistan was quoted
in a Moroccan newspaper as saying that American soldiers tore pages
from the Koran and threw them in toilets, according to a BBC
translation of the article....

~~ snip ~~


from
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2005-05-16-claims-detainees_x.htm



Dan Clore
2005-05-17 18:57:53 EST
Stan de SD wrote:
> "MrPepper11" <MrPepper11@go.com> wrote in message
> news:1116351901.770389.309470@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
>>May 17, 2005
>>Demonize, Disguise, Divert
>>Pinning the Blame on Newsweek
>>By ROBERT JENSEN and PAT YOUNGBLOOD
>>
>>If there is a political playbook for right-wing conservatives these
>>days, it no doubt begins, "Step #1: Whenever possible, blame the news
>>media."
>
> So a news agency, blinded by its own political bias, feels compelled to run
> a story that results in inflamed passions, violence and death,can't be
> bothered to verify the volatile accusation the entire story is based around,
> can't accept blame for it's own actions?

Newsweek let a Bush administration official see the story
for comment before it was published. No criticism of it then.

So now Newsweek retracts the allegation that some Pentagon
report says this happened. But that doesn't mean it didn't
happen:

News & Views for Anarchists & Activists:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smygo

Guerrilla News Network
http://www.guerrillanews.com/headlines/2883/Newsweek_Got_Gitmo_Right
[The story includes many links.--DC]
Newsweek Got Gitmo Right
Mon, 16 May 2005 09:43:44 -0500
Summary:

The toilet incident was reported in the Washington Post in a
2003 interview with a former detainee from Afghanistan:
Tarek Derghoul, another of the British detainees, similarly
cites instances of Koran desecration in an interview with
Cage Prisoners. Desecration of the Koran was also mentioned
by former Guantanamo detainee Abdul Rahim Muslim Dost. It
wasn't Newsweek that has caused the unfortunate deaths in
Afghanistan, it's the White House policy on secrecy at
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and the continuing violation of the
prisoner's human rights.

By Calgacus
Republished from Antiwar
Newsweek caves in to the White House gag rule, but the
evidence can't be erased.

Contrary to White House spin, the allegations of religious
desecration at Guantanamo published by Newsweek on May 9,
2005, are common among ex-prisoners and have been widely
reported outside the United States. Several former detainees
at the Guantanamo and Bagram prisons have reported instances
of their handlers sitting or standing on the Koran, throwing
or kicking it in toilets, and urinating on it. Prior to the
Newsweek article, the New York Times reported a Guantanamo
insider asserting that the commander of the facility was
compelled by prisoner protests to address the problem and
issue an apology.

One such incident (during which the Koran was allegedly
thrown in a pile and stepped on) prompted a hunger strike
among Guantanamo detainees in March 2002. Regarding this,
the New York Times in a May 1, 2005, article interviewed a
former detainee, Nasser Nijer Naser al-Mutairi, who said the
protest ended with a senior officer delivering an apology to
the entire camp. And the Times reports: "A former
interrogator at Guantanamo, in an interview with the Times,
confirmed the accounts of the hunger strikes, including the
public expression of regret over the treatment of the
Korans." (Neil A. Lewis and Eric Schmitt, "Inquiry Finds
Abuses at Guantanamo Bay," New York Times, May 1, 2005.)

The hunger strike and apology story is also confirmed by
another former detainee, Shafiq Rasul, interviewed by the UK
Guardian in 2003 (James Meek, "The People the Law Forgot,"
Dec. 3, 2003). It was also confirmed by former prisoner
Jamal al-Harith in an interview with the Daily Mirror (Rosa
Prince and Gary Jones, "My Hell in Camp X-Ray," Daily
Mirror, March 12, 2004).

The toilet incident was reported in the Washington Post in a
2003 interview with a former detainee from Afghanistan:

"Ehsannullah, 29, said American soldiers who initially
questioned him in Kandahar before shipping him to Guantanamo
hit him and taunted him by dumping the Koran in a toilet.
'It was a very bad situation for us,' said Ehsannullah, who
comes from the home region of the Taliban leader, Mohammad
Omar. 'We cried so much and shouted, "Please do not do that
to the Holy Koran."' (Marc Kaufman and April Witt, “Out of
Legal Limbo, Some Tell of Mistreatment," Washington Post,
March 26, 2003.)

Also citing the toilet incident is testimony by Asif Iqbal,
a former Guantanamo detainee who was released to British
custody in March 2004 and subsequently freed without charge:

"The behavior of the guards towards our religious practices
as well as the Koran was also, in my view, designed to cause
us as much distress as possible. They would kick the Koran,
throw it into the toilet, and generally disrespect it."
(Center for Constitutional Rights [.pdf], Aug. 4, 2004.)

The claim that U.S. troops at Bagram prison in Afghanistan
urinated on the Koran was made by former detainee Mohamed
Mazouz, a Moroccan, as reported in the Moroccan newspaper,
La Gazette du Maroc. (Abdelhak Najib, "Les Américains
pissaient sur le Coran et abusaient de nous sexuellement,"
April 12, 2005.) An English translation is available on the
Cage Prisoners site (which describes itself as a
"nonsectarian Islamic human rights Web site").

Tarek Derghoul, another of the British detainees, similarly
cites instances of Koran desecration in an interview with
Cage Prisoners.

Desecration of the Koran was also mentioned by former
Guantanamo detainee Abdul Rahim Muslim Dost and reported by
the BBC in early May 2005. (Haroon Rashid, "Ex-Inmates Share
Guantanamo Ordeal," May 2, 2005.)

Calgacus has been employed as a researcher in the national
security field for 20 years.

--
Dan Clore

My collected fiction, _The Unspeakable and Others_:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1587154838/thedanclorenecro/
Lord Weÿrdgliffe & Necronomicon Page:
http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/9879/
News & Views for Anarchists & Activists:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smygo

Strange pleasures are known to him who flaunts the
immarcescible purple of poetry before the color-blind.
-- Clark Ashton Smith, "Epigrams and Apothegms"


The PhAnToM
2005-05-17 19:51:58 EST

Dan Clore wrote:
> Stan de SD wrote:
> > "MrPepper11" <MrPepper11@go.com> wrote in message
> > news:1116351901.770389.309470@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> >
> >>May 17, 2005
> >>Demonize, Disguise, Divert
> >>Pinning the Blame on Newsweek
> >>By ROBERT JENSEN and PAT YOUNGBLOOD
> >>
> >>If there is a political playbook for right-wing conservatives these
> >>days, it no doubt begins, "Step #1: Whenever possible, blame the
news
> >>media."
> >
> > So a news agency, blinded by its own political bias, feels
compelled to run
> > a story that results in inflamed passions, violence and death,can't
be
> > bothered to verify the volatile accusation the entire story is
based around,
> > can't accept blame for it's own actions?
>
> Newsweek let a Bush administration official see the story
> for comment before it was published. No criticism of it then.
>
> So now Newsweek retracts the allegation that some Pentagon
> report says this happened. But that doesn't mean it didn't
> happen:
>
> News & Views for Anarchists & Activists:
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/smygo
>
> Guerrilla News Network
> http://www.guerrillanews.com/headlines/2883/Newsweek_Got_Gitmo_Right
> [The story includes many links.--DC]
> Newsweek Got Gitmo Right
> Mon, 16 May 2005 09:43:44 -0500
> Summary:
>
> The toilet incident was reported in the Washington Post in a
> 2003 interview with a former detainee from Afghanistan:
> Tarek Derghoul, another of the British detainees, similarly
> cites instances of Koran desecration in an interview with
> Cage Prisoners. Desecration of the Koran was also mentioned
> by former Guantanamo detainee Abdul Rahim Muslim Dost. It
> wasn't Newsweek that has caused the unfortunate deaths in
> Afghanistan, it's the White House policy on secrecy at
> Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and the continuing violation of the
> prisoner's human rights.

No. It's the murderers who caused these "unfortunate deaths".


Stan De SD
2005-05-17 21:32:59 EST

"Dan Clore" <clore@columbia-center.org> wrote in message
news:3evb8dF589iaU2@individual.net...
> Stan de SD wrote:
> > "MrPepper11" <MrPepper11@go.com> wrote in message
> > news:1116351901.770389.309470@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> >
> >>May 17, 2005
> >>Demonize, Disguise, Divert
> >>Pinning the Blame on Newsweek
> >>By ROBERT JENSEN and PAT YOUNGBLOOD
> >>
> >>If there is a political playbook for right-wing conservatives these
> >>days, it no doubt begins, "Step #1: Whenever possible, blame the news
> >>media."
> >
> > So a news agency, blinded by its own political bias, feels compelled to
run
> > a story that results in inflamed passions, violence and death,can't be
> > bothered to verify the volatile accusation the entire story is based
around,
> > can't accept blame for it's own actions?
>
> Newsweek let a Bush administration official see the story
> for comment before it was published. No criticism of it then.

Ever consider that the "Bush administration official" probably knew nothing
about it, and unlike know-it-all loudmouth liberals, wisely decided not to
comment on it?

> So now Newsweek retracts the allegation that some Pentagon
> report says this happened. But that doesn't mean it didn't
> happen:

If you make the accusation, it's you responsibility to back up your
assertion that it happened, not play Dan Clore weasel games...



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