Activism Discussion: Organized Labour? Not Really Considering."Unionized Labour Labour Has Continued Its Downward Death Spiral From Representing One Third Of The Workforce In The 1950s To Less Than 12 Percent Today." Fellner.

Organized Labour? Not Really Considering."Unionized Labour Labour Has Continued Its Downward Death Spiral From Representing One Third Of The Workforce In The 1950s To Less Than 12 Percent Today." Fellner.
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2005-07-25 20:48:07 EST
Organized labour has continued its downward death spiral from
representing one third of the workforce in the 1950s to less than 12
percent today.
In her inspiring article "The Labor Movement: It's More than We
Bargain for" Kim Fellner member of the National Writers Union Local
1981:
http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/fellner240705.html
we get appraised of a desperate situation in our workplaces from an
ardent unionist.
It may well be time for unionized folks to recognize the losing battle
they face due to their leadership's lack of militancy and shortage of
new ideas which once invigorated the people of the early 50's and 60's
to achieve great things on behalf of labour.

Having worked in the Daimler-Chrysler organization now as a member of
the CAW for 8 years and kept down as a Part Time worker with no
benefits , I will be very interested in how our Unions imagination
curve has progressed here in Canada. Our local plant here in Brampton
seems to be the target of the CAW for strike September 20,2005.

The new world order is upon us and in light of its arrival we must ask
ourselves some pointed questions.
Can organized labour get itself off the proverbial mat and stand up for
the working poor again everywhere?
Is there enough creative spirit left in the labour movement to prevent
the boiling frog syndrome from happening to those of us who depend on
our unions for guidance and past abilities to increase their domain?
Questions we will have to keep asking I suppose as growing poverty
remains our ugliest reminder of that failing.
thanks
steven kaasgaard


Tom P.
2005-07-26 00:18:28 EST
2*o@ica.net wrote:
> Organized labour has continued its downward death spiral from
> representing one third of the workforce in the 1950s to less than 12
> percent today.
> In her inspiring article "The Labor Movement: It's More than We
> Bargain for" Kim Fellner member of the National Writers Union Local
> 1981:
> http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/fellner240705.html
> we get appraised of a desperate situation in our workplaces from an
> ardent unionist.
> It may well be time for unionized folks to recognize the losing battle
> they face due to their leadership's lack of militancy and shortage of
> new ideas which once invigorated the people of the early 50's and 60's
> to achieve great things on behalf of labour.
>
> Having worked in the Daimler-Chrysler organization now as a member of
> the CAW for 8 years and kept down as a Part Time worker with no
> benefits , I will be very interested in how our Unions imagination
> curve has progressed here in Canada. Our local plant here in Brampton
> seems to be the target of the CAW for strike September 20,2005.
>
> The new world order is upon us and in light of its arrival we must ask
> ourselves some pointed questions.
> Can organized labour get itself off the proverbial mat and stand up for
> the working poor again everywhere?
> Is there enough creative spirit left in the labour movement to prevent
> the boiling frog syndrome from happening to those of us who depend on
> our unions for guidance and past abilities to increase their domain?
> Questions we will have to keep asking I suppose as growing poverty
> remains our ugliest reminder of that failing.
> thanks
> steven kaasgaard
>
Unfortunately for the average Canadian, the tide has turned in favour of
large corporations. As a result the standard of living for the average
person has been steadily dropping. In the fifties, a man could support
his family and have a decent standard of living on just his income.
Today a 2 income family is just barely surviving.

The answer to improving our lifestyle is in the political arena.
Corporate donations and legal teams have suppressed any attempts by our
political parties to help Canadians and have focused on corporate tax
breaks and bail outs.

Meanwhile, average Canadians have seen tax increases and reductions to
health care, education, employment insurance, child care expenses,
social services etc. Farmers, civil servants and the armed forces have
all seen reductions in benefits and pay.

The private media has done an excellent job at portraying unions and the
NDP and other organised groups trying to turn the tide on corporations
in order to improve Canadian citzens standard of living as bad for the
economy.

Until we get a government that works on behalf of it's average citizens
and not just the elite few, our standard of living will keep sliding down.

Peter White
2005-07-26 00:24:16 EST
Well done Tom P!
Its going to be interesting now to watch the 'silence'.
These geeks who clamor "all you people do is take shots at us" get
awfully quiet whenever a concise statement as yours appears.
The reason it fucks them is that there is no extra verbiage for them to
use to 'change the subject'.
Yeah WELL DONE ...... 'The Sounds of Silence'




Tom P. wrote:

> 23skidoo@ica.net wrote:
>
>> Organized labour has continued its downward death spiral from
>> representing one third of the workforce in the 1950s to less than 12
>> percent today.
>> In her inspiring article "The Labor Movement: It's More than We
>> Bargain for" Kim Fellner member of the National Writers Union Local
>> 1981:
>> http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/fellner240705.html
>> we get appraised of a desperate situation in our workplaces from an
>> ardent unionist.
>> It may well be time for unionized folks to recognize the losing battle
>> they face due to their leadership's lack of militancy and shortage of
>> new ideas which once invigorated the people of the early 50's and 60's
>> to achieve great things on behalf of labour.
>>
>> Having worked in the Daimler-Chrysler organization now as a member of
>> the CAW for 8 years and kept down as a Part Time worker with no
>> benefits , I will be very interested in how our Unions imagination
>> curve has progressed here in Canada. Our local plant here in Brampton
>> seems to be the target of the CAW for strike September 20,2005.
>>
>> The new world order is upon us and in light of its arrival we must ask
>> ourselves some pointed questions.
>> Can organized labour get itself off the proverbial mat and stand up for
>> the working poor again everywhere?
>> Is there enough creative spirit left in the labour movement to prevent
>> the boiling frog syndrome from happening to those of us who depend on
>> our unions for guidance and past abilities to increase their domain?
>> Questions we will have to keep asking I suppose as growing poverty
>> remains our ugliest reminder of that failing.
>> thanks steven kaasgaard
>>
> Unfortunately for the average Canadian, the tide has turned in favour of
> large corporations. As a result the standard of living for the average
> person has been steadily dropping. In the fifties, a man could support
> his family and have a decent standard of living on just his income.
> Today a 2 income family is just barely surviving.
>
> The answer to improving our lifestyle is in the political arena.
> Corporate donations and legal teams have suppressed any attempts by our
> political parties to help Canadians and have focused on corporate tax
> breaks and bail outs.
>
> Meanwhile, average Canadians have seen tax increases and reductions to
> health care, education, employment insurance, child care expenses,
> social services etc. Farmers, civil servants and the armed forces have
> all seen reductions in benefits and pay.
>
> The private media has done an excellent job at portraying unions and the
> NDP and other organised groups trying to turn the tide on corporations
> in order to improve Canadian citzens standard of living as bad for the
> economy.
>
> Until we get a government that works on behalf of it's average citizens
> and not just the elite few, our standard of living will keep sliding down.


Leo J Callaghan
2005-07-26 12:13:56 EST
On 25 Jul 2005 17:48:07 -0700, "23skidoo@ica.net" <23skidoo@ica.net>
wrote:

> Organized labour has continued its downward death spiral from
>representing one third of the workforce in the 1950s to less than 12
>percent today.
>In her inspiring article "The Labor Movement: It's More than We
>Bargain for" Kim Fellner member of the National Writers Union Local
>1981:
>http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/fellner240705.html
>we get appraised of a desperate situation in our workplaces from an
>ardent unionist.
>It may well be time for unionized folks to recognize the losing battle
>they face due to their leadership's lack of militancy and shortage of
>new ideas which once invigorated the people of the early 50's and 60's
>to achieve great things on behalf of labour.
>
>Having worked in the Daimler-Chrysler organization now as a member of
>the CAW for 8 years and kept down as a Part Time worker with no
>benefits , I will be very interested in how our Unions imagination
>curve has progressed here in Canada. Our local plant here in Brampton
>seems to be the target of the CAW for strike September 20,2005.
>
>The new world order is upon us and in light of its arrival we must ask
>ourselves some pointed questions.
>Can organized labour get itself off the proverbial mat and stand up for
>the working poor again everywhere?
>Is there enough creative spirit left in the labour movement to prevent
>the boiling frog syndrome from happening to those of us who depend on
>our unions for guidance and past abilities to increase their domain?
>Questions we will have to keep asking I suppose as growing poverty
>remains our ugliest reminder of that failing.
>thanks
>steven kaasgaard
>


amazing. aren't you a deep green nut? you work for a car maker.
doesn't that make you a traitor to the movement? how can you live with
yourself?

how about the boys and girls on the line making $60-$100k/yr? what are
they doing for your poverty? are they greedy? gosh no, of course not.
they are just doing the job.

hypocrite.

Leo J Callaghan
2005-07-26 12:17:41 EST
On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 23:18:28 -0500, "Tom P." <nospam@nospam.com>
wrote:

>*o@ica.net wrote:
>> Organized labour has continued its downward death spiral from
>> representing one third of the workforce in the 1950s to less than 12
>> percent today.
>> In her inspiring article "The Labor Movement: It's More than We
>> Bargain for" Kim Fellner member of the National Writers Union Local
>> 1981:
>> http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/fellner240705.html
>> we get appraised of a desperate situation in our workplaces from an
>> ardent unionist.
>> It may well be time for unionized folks to recognize the losing battle
>> they face due to their leadership's lack of militancy and shortage of
>> new ideas which once invigorated the people of the early 50's and 60's
>> to achieve great things on behalf of labour.
>>
>> Having worked in the Daimler-Chrysler organization now as a member of
>> the CAW for 8 years and kept down as a Part Time worker with no
>> benefits , I will be very interested in how our Unions imagination
>> curve has progressed here in Canada. Our local plant here in Brampton
>> seems to be the target of the CAW for strike September 20,2005.
>>
>> The new world order is upon us and in light of its arrival we must ask
>> ourselves some pointed questions.
>> Can organized labour get itself off the proverbial mat and stand up for
>> the working poor again everywhere?
>> Is there enough creative spirit left in the labour movement to prevent
>> the boiling frog syndrome from happening to those of us who depend on
>> our unions for guidance and past abilities to increase their domain?
>> Questions we will have to keep asking I suppose as growing poverty
>> remains our ugliest reminder of that failing.
>> thanks
>> steven kaasgaard
>>
>Unfortunately for the average Canadian, the tide has turned in favour of
> large corporations. As a result the standard of living for the average
>person has been steadily dropping. In the fifties, a man could support
>his family and have a decent standard of living on just his income.
>Today a 2 income family is just barely surviving.

what is the highest cost for that family: taxes.

and who are biggest beneficiaries of those taxes: car companies.

the ndp used to call it corporate welfare. it still is but now they
call it good, sound economics. hah.

>
>The answer to improving our lifestyle is in the political arena.
>Corporate donations and legal teams have suppressed any attempts by our
>political parties to help Canadians and have focused on corporate tax
>breaks and bail outs.

the majority of canadians work for small companies, 10 employees or
less. now what were you saying?

>
>Meanwhile, average Canadians have seen tax increases and reductions to
>health care, education, employment insurance, child care expenses,
>social services etc. Farmers, civil servants and the armed forces have
>all seen reductions in benefits and pay.

unlimited demand and limited supply of tax dollars. what is your
point?

>
>The private media has done an excellent job at portraying unions and the
>NDP and other organised groups trying to turn the tide on corporations
>in order to improve Canadian citzens standard of living as bad for the
>economy.
>
>Until we get a government that works on behalf of it's average citizens
>and not just the elite few, our standard of living will keep sliding down.

sure. get organized. start a party and tell us how it turned out.

John D
2005-07-27 19:34:52 EST
The trade unions should be spending every minute of every day and every
dollar of members' dues organizing workers in the overseas countries where
the jobs are going. It does no good to strike against an employer here
when that same employer is just going to switch production to a plant where
workers make 1/10th the wages with no benefits, no environmental or safety
standards and low taxes.

The borders are open, universal free trade is upon us. Do the math.


-JD

"Leo J Callaghan" <leo_callaghan@telus.net> wrote in message
news:42e66160.90042614@news.gv.shawcable.net...
> On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 23:18:28 -0500, "Tom P." <nospam@nospam.com>
> wrote:
>
>>23skidoo@ica.net wrote:
>>> Organized labour has continued its downward death spiral from
>>> representing one third of the workforce in the 1950s to less than 12
>>> percent today.
>>> In her inspiring article "The Labor Movement: It's More than We
>>> Bargain for" Kim Fellner member of the National Writers Union Local
>>> 1981:
>>> http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/fellner240705.html
>>> we get appraised of a desperate situation in our workplaces from an
>>> ardent unionist.
>>> It may well be time for unionized folks to recognize the losing battle
>>> they face due to their leadership's lack of militancy and shortage of
>>> new ideas which once invigorated the people of the early 50's and 60's
>>> to achieve great things on behalf of labour.
>>>
>>> Having worked in the Daimler-Chrysler organization now as a member of
>>> the CAW for 8 years and kept down as a Part Time worker with no
>>> benefits , I will be very interested in how our Unions imagination
>>> curve has progressed here in Canada. Our local plant here in Brampton
>>> seems to be the target of the CAW for strike September 20,2005.
>>>
>>> The new world order is upon us and in light of its arrival we must ask
>>> ourselves some pointed questions.
>>> Can organized labour get itself off the proverbial mat and stand up for
>>> the working poor again everywhere?
>>> Is there enough creative spirit left in the labour movement to prevent
>>> the boiling frog syndrome from happening to those of us who depend on
>>> our unions for guidance and past abilities to increase their domain?
>>> Questions we will have to keep asking I suppose as growing poverty
>>> remains our ugliest reminder of that failing.
>>> thanks
>>> steven kaasgaard
>>>
>>Unfortunately for the average Canadian, the tide has turned in favour of
>> large corporations. As a result the standard of living for the average
>>person has been steadily dropping. In the fifties, a man could support
>>his family and have a decent standard of living on just his income.
>>Today a 2 income family is just barely surviving.
>
> what is the highest cost for that family: taxes.
>
> and who are biggest beneficiaries of those taxes: car companies.
>
> the ndp used to call it corporate welfare. it still is but now they
> call it good, sound economics. hah.
>
>>
>>The answer to improving our lifestyle is in the political arena.
>>Corporate donations and legal teams have suppressed any attempts by our
>>political parties to help Canadians and have focused on corporate tax
>>breaks and bail outs.
>
> the majority of canadians work for small companies, 10 employees or
> less. now what were you saying?
>
>>
>>Meanwhile, average Canadians have seen tax increases and reductions to
>>health care, education, employment insurance, child care expenses,
>>social services etc. Farmers, civil servants and the armed forces have
>>all seen reductions in benefits and pay.
>
> unlimited demand and limited supply of tax dollars. what is your
> point?
>
>>
>>The private media has done an excellent job at portraying unions and the
>>NDP and other organised groups trying to turn the tide on corporations
>>in order to improve Canadian citzens standard of living as bad for the
>>economy.
>>
>>Until we get a government that works on behalf of it's average citizens
>>and not just the elite few, our standard of living will keep sliding down.
>
> sure. get organized. start a party and tell us how it turned out.



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Leo J Callaghan
2005-07-28 17:38:08 EST
On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 19:34:52 -0400, "John D" <Wendygem@bmts.com>
wrote:

>The trade unions should be spending every minute of every day and every
>dollar of members' dues organizing workers in the overseas countries where
>the jobs are going. It does no good to strike against an employer here
>when that same employer is just going to switch production to a plant where
>workers make 1/10th the wages with no benefits, no environmental or safety
>standards and low taxes.
>
>The borders are open, universal free trade is upon us. Do the math.
>
>
>-JD
>

you need to check your equation. it is wrong. and immoral.


>"Leo J Callaghan" <leo_callaghan@telus.net> wrote in message
>news:42e66160.90042614@news.gv.shawcable.net...
>> On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 23:18:28 -0500, "Tom P." <nospam@nospam.com>
>> wrote:
>>
>>>23skidoo@ica.net wrote:
>>>> Organized labour has continued its downward death spiral from
>>>> representing one third of the workforce in the 1950s to less than 12
>>>> percent today.
>>>> In her inspiring article "The Labor Movement: It's More than We
>>>> Bargain for" Kim Fellner member of the National Writers Union Local
>>>> 1981:
>>>> http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/fellner240705.html
>>>> we get appraised of a desperate situation in our workplaces from an
>>>> ardent unionist.
>>>> It may well be time for unionized folks to recognize the losing battle
>>>> they face due to their leadership's lack of militancy and shortage of
>>>> new ideas which once invigorated the people of the early 50's and 60's
>>>> to achieve great things on behalf of labour.
>>>>
>>>> Having worked in the Daimler-Chrysler organization now as a member of
>>>> the CAW for 8 years and kept down as a Part Time worker with no
>>>> benefits , I will be very interested in how our Unions imagination
>>>> curve has progressed here in Canada. Our local plant here in Brampton
>>>> seems to be the target of the CAW for strike September 20,2005.
>>>>
>>>> The new world order is upon us and in light of its arrival we must ask
>>>> ourselves some pointed questions.
>>>> Can organized labour get itself off the proverbial mat and stand up for
>>>> the working poor again everywhere?
>>>> Is there enough creative spirit left in the labour movement to prevent
>>>> the boiling frog syndrome from happening to those of us who depend on
>>>> our unions for guidance and past abilities to increase their domain?
>>>> Questions we will have to keep asking I suppose as growing poverty
>>>> remains our ugliest reminder of that failing.
>>>> thanks
>>>> steven kaasgaard
>>>>
>>>Unfortunately for the average Canadian, the tide has turned in favour of
>>> large corporations. As a result the standard of living for the average
>>>person has been steadily dropping. In the fifties, a man could support
>>>his family and have a decent standard of living on just his income.
>>>Today a 2 income family is just barely surviving.
>>
>> what is the highest cost for that family: taxes.
>>
>> and who are biggest beneficiaries of those taxes: car companies.
>>
>> the ndp used to call it corporate welfare. it still is but now they
>> call it good, sound economics. hah.
>>
>>>
>>>The answer to improving our lifestyle is in the political arena.
>>>Corporate donations and legal teams have suppressed any attempts by our
>>>political parties to help Canadians and have focused on corporate tax
>>>breaks and bail outs.
>>
>> the majority of canadians work for small companies, 10 employees or
>> less. now what were you saying?
>>
>>>
>>>Meanwhile, average Canadians have seen tax increases and reductions to
>>>health care, education, employment insurance, child care expenses,
>>>social services etc. Farmers, civil servants and the armed forces have
>>>all seen reductions in benefits and pay.
>>
>> unlimited demand and limited supply of tax dollars. what is your
>> point?
>>
>>>
>>>The private media has done an excellent job at portraying unions and the
>>>NDP and other organised groups trying to turn the tide on corporations
>>>in order to improve Canadian citzens standard of living as bad for the
>>>economy.
>>>
>>>Until we get a government that works on behalf of it's average citizens
>>>and not just the elite few, our standard of living will keep sliding down.
>>
>> sure. get organized. start a party and tell us how it turned out.
>
>
>
>----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
>http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
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Wm James
2005-07-30 21:38:13 EST
On 25 Jul 2005 17:48:07 -0700, "23skidoo@ica.net" <23skidoo@ica.net>
wrote:

> Organized labour has continued its downward death spiral from
>representing one third of the workforce in the 1950s to less than 12
>percent today.

It was always vasly overinflated anyway and still is. Back in the
days when they claimed to "represent" a third of the workforce, that
was merely the membership claim. Many of the members had little or no
interest in the union but had to pay off the thugs to keep their jobs.
The unions didn't represent them. Nor did the unions represent the
suckers who stayed "between jobs" because the businesses were closing
due to the strikes and vandalism, and remained members. At best the
unions "represented" to at least some degree, only a small portion of
those they were shaking down for dues. If you want to get a
realistic picture, ban dues checkoff so the unions have to get the
mmoney from the members, and let's have a federal right to work law
and enforse it so nobody has to join a union, and then let's see how
many suckers they have paying them and whom they can claim to
represent.

William R. James

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