Activism Discussion: Thousands Of Federal Court Cases Kept Secret

Thousands Of Federal Court Cases Kept Secret
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Beebs
2006-03-06 23:19:40 EST
Thousands of Federal Cases Kept Secret
By MICHAEL J. SNIFFEN and JOHN SOLOMON, AP Writers

WASHINGTON - Despite the Sixth Amendment's
guarantee of public trials, nearly all records are
being kept secret for more than 5,000 defendants
who completed their journey through the federal
courts over the last three years. Instances of
such secrecy more than doubled from 2003 to 2005.

==

Another example of Gitmo Justice.
"Seal the records. Case Closed."

beebs
anarchist


Kent Wills
2006-03-07 00:01:55 EST
On 6 Mar 2006 20:19:40 -0800, "beebs" <beebs79@softhome.net> wrote:

>Thousands of Federal Cases Kept Secret
>By MICHAEL J. SNIFFEN and JOHN SOLOMON, AP Writers
>
>WASHINGTON - Despite the Sixth Amendment's
>guarantee of public trials, nearly all records are
>being kept secret for more than 5,000 defendants
>who completed their journey through the federal
>courts over the last three years. Instances of
>such secrecy more than doubled from 2003 to 2005.

Trials are public, except under certain circumstances. This
doesn't mean all the records of the trials aren't sealed after they're
over.

>
>==
>
>Another example of Gitmo Justice.
> "Seal the records. Case Closed."
>

I wasn't aware anyone at Gitmo had been tried.

--
Kent
No todos los que ven tus obras ven tus virtudes.

Larry
2006-03-07 00:14:41 EST
In article <dg4q029csbef1gc9vs5hcb3pjqcpd1k841@4ax.com>,
Kent Wills <compuelf@gmail.com> wrote:

> On 6 Mar 2006 20:19:40 -0800, "beebs" <beebs79@softhome.net> wrote:
>
> >Thousands of Federal Cases Kept Secret
> >By MICHAEL J. SNIFFEN and JOHN SOLOMON, AP Writers
> >
> >WASHINGTON - Despite the Sixth Amendment's
> >guarantee of public trials, nearly all records are
> >being kept secret for more than 5,000 defendants
> >who completed their journey through the federal
> >courts over the last three years. Instances of
> >such secrecy more than doubled from 2003 to 2005.
>
> Trials are public, except under certain circumstances. This
> doesn't mean all the records of the trials aren't sealed after they're
> over.

And in most cases, trials that end in acquittals are sealed after the
verdict - for the benefit of the defendant.

George Grapman
2006-03-07 00:22:12 EST
Larry wrote:fter they're
>> over.
>
> And in most cases, trials that end in acquittals are sealed after the
> verdict - for the benefit of the defendant.

Where did you ever get that idea?

--
To reply via e-mail please delete 1 c from paccbell

Larry
2006-03-07 00:49:36 EST
In article <8M8Pf.67711$PL5.8863@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com>,
George Grapman <sfgorge@paccbell.net> wrote:

> Larry wrote:fter they're
> >> over.
> >
> > And in most cases, trials that end in acquittals are sealed after the
> > verdict - for the benefit of the defendant.
>
> Where did you ever get that idea?


Because someone is innocent until proven guilty, so if they are found
not guilty, all records of the proceeding are sealed - so that the
defendant will not have any negative consequences of the unproven
charge(s).

As to where I got the idea, I can cite statutory law for you, if you
really want.

Kent Wills
2006-03-07 06:56:08 EST
On Tue, 07 Mar 2006 05:22:12 GMT, George Grapman
<*e@paccbell.net> wrote:

>Larry wrote:fter they're
>>> over.
>>
>> And in most cases, trials that end in acquittals are sealed after the
>> verdict - for the benefit of the defendant.
>
> Where did you ever get that idea?

Larry is an ADA in New York. You can be certain that if he's
claiming the records are sealed, they are sealed.

--
Kent
No todos los que ven tus obras ven tus virtudes.

Winston Smith, American Patriot
2006-03-07 11:03:29 EST
Larry <x@y.com> wrote in alt.politics.bush:

> In article <8M8Pf.67711$PL5.8863@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com>,
> George Grapman <sfgorge@paccbell.net> wrote:
>
>> Larry wrote:fter they're
>> >> over.
>> >
>> > And in most cases, trials that end in acquittals are sealed after the
>> > verdict - for the benefit of the defendant.
>>
>> Where did you ever get that idea?
>
>
> Because someone is innocent until proven guilty, so if they are found
> not guilty, all records of the proceeding are sealed - so that the
> defendant will not have any negative consequences of the unproven
> charge(s).
>
> As to where I got the idea, I can cite statutory law for you, if you
> really want.

Yeah, I'd like to see the cite(s), points and authorities, whatever of
current FEDERAL law that all criminal cases with a jury finding of "not
guilty" have their records sealed.

Sure I could spend hours at findlaw doing it myself, but then, I am not
making the claim.

I'd also like to know if the use of federal secrecy laws to cover up
criminal activity is itself a crime (a felony).

For if so, the case can be made that the act of classifying the fact of
the activities related with NSA wiretapping was itself a criminal act.



--
http://hume.realisticpolitics.com/


Estimate the worth of a man by how sincerely he greets you.
Arrive at the worth of a man by how he opens himself to you.
Know the worth of a man by how conscientiously he listens to you.
Verify the worth of a man by how warmly he takes his leave of you.

Kent Wills
2006-03-07 18:24:09 EST
On Tue, 07 Mar 2006 16:03:29 GMT, "Winston Smith, American Patriot"
<*a@Oceania.WhiteHouse.GOV> wrote:

>Larry <x@y.com> wrote in alt.politics.bush:
>
>> In article <8M8Pf.67711$PL5.8863@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com>,
>> George Grapman <sfgorge@paccbell.net> wrote:
>>
>>> Larry wrote:fter they're
>>> >> over.
>>> >
>>> > And in most cases, trials that end in acquittals are sealed after the
>>> > verdict - for the benefit of the defendant.
>>>
>>> Where did you ever get that idea?
>>
>>
>> Because someone is innocent until proven guilty, so if they are found
>> not guilty, all records of the proceeding are sealed - so that the
>> defendant will not have any negative consequences of the unproven
>> charge(s).
>>
>> As to where I got the idea, I can cite statutory law for you, if you
>> really want.
>
>Yeah, I'd like to see the cite(s), points and authorities, whatever of
>current FEDERAL law that all criminal cases with a jury finding of "not
>guilty" have their records sealed.

He didn't write all cases. He wrote, "And in MOST cases..."
(emphasis added).

>
>Sure I could spend hours at findlaw doing it myself, but then, I am not
>making the claim.
>
>I'd also like to know if the use of federal secrecy laws to cover up
>criminal activity is itself a crime (a felony).

I suppose it would be, but don't know anywhere near enough
about Federal law to say it is.

>
>For if so, the case can be made that the act of classifying the fact of
>the activities related with NSA wiretapping was itself a criminal act.

It might be.

--
Kent
No todos los que ven tus obras ven tus virtudes.

Winston Smith, American Patriot
2006-03-07 18:31:12 EST
Kent Wills <compuelf@gmail.com> wrote in alt.politics.bush:

> On Tue, 07 Mar 2006 16:03:29 GMT, "Winston Smith, American Patriot"
> <FranzKafka@Oceania.WhiteHouse.GOV> wrote:
>
>>Larry <x@y.com> wrote in alt.politics.bush:
>>
>>> In article <8M8Pf.67711$PL5.8863@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com>,
>>> George Grapman <sfgorge@paccbell.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Larry wrote:fter they're
>>>> >> over.
>>>> >
>>>> > And in most cases, trials that end in acquittals are sealed after
>>>> > the verdict - for the benefit of the defendant.
>>>>
>>>> Where did you ever get that idea?
>>>
>>>
>>> Because someone is innocent until proven guilty, so if they are
>>> found not guilty, all records of the proceeding are sealed - so that
>>> the defendant will not have any negative consequences of the
>>> unproven charge(s).
>>>
>>> As to where I got the idea, I can cite statutory law for you, if you
>>> really want.
>>
>>Yeah, I'd like to see the cite(s), points and authorities, whatever of
>>current FEDERAL law that all criminal cases with a jury finding of
>>"not guilty" have their records sealed.
>
> He didn't write all cases. He wrote, "And in MOST cases..."
> (emphasis added).


The logic of making exceptions would be....?


>
>>
>>Sure I could spend hours at findlaw doing it myself, but then, I am
>>not making the claim.
>>
>>I'd also like to know if the use of federal secrecy laws to cover up
>>criminal activity is itself a crime (a felony).
>
> I suppose it would be, but don't know anywhere near enough
> about Federal law to say it is.
>
>>
>>For if so, the case can be made that the act of classifying the fact
>>of the activities related with NSA wiretapping was itself a criminal
>>act.
>
> It might be.
>



--
http://hume.realisticpolitics.com/


Estimate the worth of a man by how sincerely he greets you.
Arrive at the worth of a man by how he opens himself to you.
Know the worth of a man by how conscientiously he listens to you.
Verify the worth of a man by how warmly he takes his leave of you.

Kent Wills
2006-03-07 20:18:15 EST
On Tue, 07 Mar 2006 23:31:12 GMT, "Winston Smith, American Patriot"
<*a@Oceania.WhiteHouse.GOV> wrote:

>> On Tue, 07 Mar 2006 16:03:29 GMT, "Winston Smith, American Patriot"
>> <FranzKafka@Oceania.WhiteHouse.GOV> wrote:
>>
>>>Larry <x@y.com> wrote in alt.politics.bush:
>>>
>>>> In article <8M8Pf.67711$PL5.8863@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com>,
>>>> George Grapman <sfgorge@paccbell.net> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Larry wrote:fter they're
>>>>> >> over.
>>>>> >
>>>>> > And in most cases, trials that end in acquittals are sealed after
>>>>> > the verdict - for the benefit of the defendant.
>>>>>
>>>>> Where did you ever get that idea?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Because someone is innocent until proven guilty, so if they are
>>>> found not guilty, all records of the proceeding are sealed - so that
>>>> the defendant will not have any negative consequences of the
>>>> unproven charge(s).
>>>>
>>>> As to where I got the idea, I can cite statutory law for you, if you
>>>> really want.
>>>
>>>Yeah, I'd like to see the cite(s), points and authorities, whatever of
>>>current FEDERAL law that all criminal cases with a jury finding of
>>>"not guilty" have their records sealed.
>>
>> He didn't write all cases. He wrote, "And in MOST cases..."
>> (emphasis added).
>
>
>The logic of making exceptions would be....?

I don't know. Larry will need to answer that. I simply
pointed out that he didn't write all of the cases.

--
Kent
No todos los que ven tus obras ven tus virtudes.
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