Home-school Discussion: Why Home School, Why Standard?

Why Home School, Why Standard?
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SafeEarthSafeChild
2007-08-14 01:46:51 EST
I'm sure that I am not the first to wonder about this, but we have some
pretty good public schools around us but we currently have our little man at
home and are wondering about whether or not we will want to send our Little
Man out, keep him in, or send him to a private school (I went to a Catholic
school for years).

Any thoughts?



Scott Bryce
2007-08-14 09:56:02 EST
SafeEarthSafeChild wrote:

> I'm sure that I am not the first to wonder about this, but we have some
> pretty good public schools around us but we currently have our little man at
> home and are wondering about whether or not we will want to send our Little
> Man out, keep him in, or send him to a private school (I went to a Catholic
> school for years).

Nobody can make that decision for you. The first thing you will want to
consider is why you are homeschooling him. Can you accomplish your
purpose better by keeping him home than by sending him to public or
private school?

Michael S. Morris
2007-08-14 09:58:00 EST

Tuesday, the 14th of August, 2007

SafeEarthSafeChild wrote:
I'm sure that I am not the first to wonder about this, but we have some
pretty good public schools around us but we currently have our little
man at
home and are wondering about whether or not we will want to send our
Little
Man out, keep him in, or send him to a private school (I went to a
Catholic
school for years).

Any thoughts?

I went to public schools for years. Made lots of A's.
I was valedictorian of a large high school class. My wife and
chose to homeschool because we thought we could do
transfinitely better teaching our own children than the
public schools could ever do. As measured by subjects covered,
books read, and with a smaller amount of time per day spent
on "school" by our children. Our children are now 17, 15, and
8. The 17-year-old finished calculus in math two years ago,
has read probably 30 times more books than I ever had to read
for school, can read novels in Spanish, and is taking
ordinary college classes in writing and Japanese at present.
So, *our* reason for homeschooling is that we don't think that
there is any such thing as "pretty good public schools". Or
private schools for that matter.

But I also can report after 12 years of homeschooling our children
that it has made the life of our family simply transfinitely better
than ever was my experience of family life growing up in the 60s
and 70s, where school ate up 40-50 hours a week, and "family
time" was sitting around a television set.

I wouldn't recommend homeschooling as an option, though, to
anyone who isn't absolutely committed to doing it.

Mike Morris
(*s@netdirect.net)




Tj
2007-08-15 15:23:10 EST
Do what good teachers do. Decide what you want the end results to be, then
choose the course of action that you believe will take your child to those
results. Despite what you will hear from some of the more bigoted
homeshoolers here, any of the 3 major forms of education can result in a
great education.

Keep in mind, also, what good teachers have realized for generations. You
are not locked into any decision. Change or modify any decision if it is
not achieving the results you want. You also don't have to choose
exclusively one form of education over another. Mix and match as you see
fit. My parents sent me to Lutheran kindergarten (we're not Lutheran, btw)
and then to public schools after that. In HS, I took classes at a private
university at the same time as I attended a public high school. In some
areas, you can homeschool and attend public school part-time (although you
may have to ask really nicely, as the school may not receive funding for the
additional student).

Also, depending on where you live, you may have access to public resources
even if you homeschool or attend private schools. In IL, we have regional
education libraries, chock full of educational materials that can be checked
out by public/private/homeschooling teachers.

In my opinion, you would be best served by the mix and match method. It
allows you to pick those elements from each system that best meet your
needs. Of course, it takes more work on your part, but that is part and
parcel of good teaching in a standards based teaching situation.

Hope this helps.

tj

"SafeEarthSafeChild" <safeearthsafechild@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:flbwi.3857$r14.64@trndny06...
> I'm sure that I am not the first to wonder about this, but we have some
> pretty good public schools around us but we currently have our little man
> at
> home and are wondering about whether or not we will want to send our
> Little
> Man out, keep him in, or send him to a private school (I went to a
> Catholic
> school for years).
>
> Any thoughts?
>



Stephanie
2007-08-21 18:03:22 EST

"SafeEarthSafeChild" <safeearthsafechild@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:flbwi.3857$r14.64@trndny06...
> I'm sure that I am not the first to wonder about this, but we have some
> pretty good public schools around us but we currently have our little man
> at
> home and are wondering about whether or not we will want to send our
> Little
> Man out, keep him in, or send him to a private school (I went to a
> Catholic
> school for years).
>
> Any thoughts?
>

(newbie here)

I can tell you my reasons/goals:

- desire for education that is fun, challenging and engaging with a hope of
fostering a life long love of learning.
- desire for an education that is appropriate to my children's learning
needs, not driven the arbitraryu grouping of age. desire to work at his
level; moving faster in strength to engender enthusiam rather than bordom,
moving slower in harder areas to engender results and positive pride in
accomplishment rather than guilt and frustration of lower achievement that
was unattainable.
- desire to speak to multiple learning styles, with a stronger presentation
in the favored learning style.
- desire to offer choice and democracy as well as responsibility with and
for learning.
- desire to have a more appropriate socialization than I see in our public
school here with grouping based on common interest and understanding rather
than age, with positive learning of problem solving skills rather than with
punitive response to rule breaking.
- desire to spend time with my children
- desire to try and foster a love of things like beans and tuna fish. Ok
that last one is a joke. But we sure wont be eating steaks too often
anymore!


- de



Tj
2007-08-21 18:12:30 EST
Welcome, Stephanie!

tj


"Stephanie" <haaa@noway.net> wrote in message
news:KiJyi.8728$pf3.7667@trndny06...
>
> "SafeEarthSafeChild" <safeearthsafechild@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:flbwi.3857$r14.64@trndny06...
>> I'm sure that I am not the first to wonder about this, but we have some
>> pretty good public schools around us but we currently have our little man
>> at
>> home and are wondering about whether or not we will want to send our
>> Little
>> Man out, keep him in, or send him to a private school (I went to a
>> Catholic
>> school for years).
>>
>> Any thoughts?
>>
>
> (newbie here)
>
> I can tell you my reasons/goals:
>
> - desire for education that is fun, challenging and engaging with a hope
> of fostering a life long love of learning.
> - desire for an education that is appropriate to my children's learning
> needs, not driven the arbitraryu grouping of age. desire to work at his
> level; moving faster in strength to engender enthusiam rather than bordom,
> moving slower in harder areas to engender results and positive pride in
> accomplishment rather than guilt and frustration of lower achievement that
> was unattainable.
> - desire to speak to multiple learning styles, with a stronger
> presentation in the favored learning style.
> - desire to offer choice and democracy as well as responsibility with and
> for learning.
> - desire to have a more appropriate socialization than I see in our public
> school here with grouping based on common interest and understanding
> rather than age, with positive learning of problem solving skills rather
> than with punitive response to rule breaking.
> - desire to spend time with my children
> - desire to try and foster a love of things like beans and tuna fish. Ok
> that last one is a joke. But we sure wont be eating steaks too often
> anymore!
>
>
> - de
>



Bruce Atchison - Author
2008-10-02 19:25:00 EST
Greetings;

I haven't had direct experience but I'd say that home schooling is the best
way to educate children. Private day schools are good too, from what I've
heard, but I'd avoid boarding schools if I was you. I was exiled 500 miles
to one for 6 years and I'm still recovering from the experience.

Respectfully,

Bruce Atchison - author of Deliverance from Jericho (Six Years in a Blind
School) and When a Man Loves a Rabbit ((Learning and Living With Bunnies).

http://www.bookstream.biz/cgi-bin/bookstream/bookstore.cgi?overlord=Details&store_id=132

http://www.bookstream.biz/cgi-bin/bookstream/bookstore.cgi?overlord=Details&store_id=102


** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

Marty Carts
2008-10-03 01:21:43 EST
Bruce Atchison - author wrote:
> Greetings;

> I haven't had direct experience but I'd say that home schooling is the best
> way to educate children. Private day schools are good too, from what I've
> heard, but I'd avoid boarding schools if I was you. I was exiled 500 miles
> to one for 6 years and I'm still recovering from the experience.

Greetings, Bruce.
I have had direct experience, in the way of being
a father of three hsed children since birth (their
birth, not mine). For us hsing is clearly the best
education in the academics and other areas (world
consciousness, morality, religion, etc.) I strongly
suspect most others would find this true for
themselves too, if they were able to hs, and willing
to trust that they could.

Like you, my school upbringing (public school in my
case) didn't leave me with a desire to do the same
to my own children. We decided to hs before our
first was born.

This newsgroup (misc.education.home-school.christian)
is pretty quiet since a troll essentially defecated
upon it continuously for a few years. We moved to
a web format location, to which you're welcome,
tho it's fairly quiet too. Most of us are fairly
old hsers and there's less specifically hs-related
stuff to talk about between us. But give us a try:
http://www.meh-sc.org ______________________Marty
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